Democratic response to McDonnell’s speech

Ward Armstrong
I want to begin by offering my deepest condolences to the victims and the families who were affected by Saturday’s tragic shooting in Tucson, Arizona. The thoughts and prayers of millions of Virginians and Americans are with the families of those killed and wounded as they cope with this heinous act.

If any good can come from this tragedy it’s this. We should take this opportunity to examine how we deal with one another in political discussions. Words matter. And while it’s important to have vigorous debate on the issues facing our state and our country, tone is important.

We need to be more civil to one another and avoid harshness. I and my Democratic colleagues pledge to work to avoid the political rancor that has consumed Washington and the country these past few months and bring honor to a capitol designed by Thomas Jefferson and occupied by statesmen like Washington and Henry.

We can’t or won’t censor anyone’s first amendment rights to free speech. But we need to remind ourselves that each of us, elected representatives and individual citizens alike, has a personal responsibility to maintain a level of public discourse that is respectful to people we disagree with and inclusive of different points of view.

The Governor’s speech tonight was filled with a number of priorities -- funding for transportation, higher education and job creation. Those are goals that Virginia Democrats share. Where we have serious differences is how to pay for them.

In 2010 voters from around the country, including here in Virginia, went to the polls with a very simple message for their government: watch your spending and stop mortgaging our future by spending more money than you are taking in. Virginia Democrats heard you loud and clear.

I recall that Governor McDonnell campaigned for dozens of Republicans and Tea Party candidates who were running on that very message. But while he talks a pretty good game about small government and cutting spending, his legislative agenda suggests that he has not gotten the point made in the last election when it comes to deficit spending.

Virginia has a long tradition of responsible financial management. We don’t spend money we don’t have. We don’t run up massive amounts of debt. We balance our budgets fairly and honestly. For eight years Democratic governors Mark Warner and Tim Kaine ran this Commonwealth using those principles of responsible fiscal leadership and pay-as-you-go budgeting that earned Virginia a AAA bond-rating and a reputation as one of the best managed states in the country.

The legislative agenda that the Governor outlined tonight is a pretty big departure from those principles. Worse, it’s a real threat to Virginia’s long-term economic health. The governor has a long wish list of expensive items but no sound plan on how to pay for them. For example, he wants to take on over $3 billion in new debt to pay for transportation projects. The end result could be that we wind up stacking more government debt on top of Virginia families at a time when many of them are having trouble paying their own bills.

We can’t afford to let the Governor put it all on the state’s credit card for future generations to pick up the tab.

That is at the heart of the philosophical difference between Democrats and Republicans in Virginia. Our party is founded on the principles of economic growth, job creation, good education and expanding opportunity around the Commonwealth. But we also believe in sound financial management.

The Governor and Republicans may be comfortable running up debt to pay for expensive priorities, but I believe I speak for most Virginians when I say we don’t want to run Virginia’s government that way.

This session Democrats are going to continue our fight for legislation that makes life better for Virginia families, without mortgaging the future. Over the next few weeks you’ll hear us talk about bills that will create jobs, keep the cost of important items like electricity and cable service low, improve our public schools and make communities across the state safer.

We are completely focused on the issues that matter to families across this Commonwealth. Which is why we likely won’t support the governor’s plan to sell off the state’s ABC stores. The problem with that plan is the state receives a lot of revenue from our ABC stores. Privatizing them will cost the state money. That means funding cuts to schools and police.

In addition, the governor wants to triple the number of liquor stores in the state. We think most people don’t want more liquor stores in their neighborhood.

I’m proud of the proposals that members of our House and Senate caucuses have put forward. I hope my Republican colleagues, particularly in the House of Delegates, will consider these proposals, not based on the political party of the legislator who introduced them but on the merits of the bills themselves.

Over the next 40 days or so Democrats and Republicans are going to have to work together on a lot of issues that are important to the future of our Commonwealth. Governor McDonnell is my friend. He and I both want Virginians to have good jobs. We both want our kids to have a good education. We want all Virginians to have a great quality of life.

Where we disagree is how to get there.

So what to do. Well we’re taught from our very first days in kindergarten that we have to get along with our neighbors. We have to talk to one another and not just bicker back and forth in the newspaper or on TV.

We have a lot of differences but we also agree on a lot as well. Democrats have some serious concerns about the agenda that the Governor put forward tonight. And while we’ll continue to make those concerns known, that doesn’t mean we aren’t open to working with Bob McDonnell and Republicans to find common ground and get things done.

I really believe we can work together to find solutions to our problems, and do it without saddling taxpayers with too much debt.

So to the Governor and his party I say let’s find that common ground. Work with us because we want to work with you. Let’s create the jobs, improve the schools and build the roads… together. The people of Virginia expect that – no -- they demand it.

God bless the Commonwealth of Virginia and the United States of America.
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Section of Lauderdale Drive to be closed April 26 for drainage improvements


The westbound lanes of Lauderdale Drive will be closed between John Rolfe Parkway and Cambridge Drive on Wednesday, April 26 for drainage improvements.

The lanes are expected to be closed from approximately 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Motorists will be detoured from westbound Lauderdale onto John Rolfe, Gayton Road and Cambridge before being directed back onto Lauderdale. > Read more.

Henrico Police to host prescription drug take-back event April 29


The Henrico County Division of Police and the U. S. Drug Enforcement Administration will participate in the nationwide Prescription Drug Take Back Program Saturday, April 29. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Henrico County Training Center, 7701 East Parham Road, next to the Public Safety Building.

The program is free and anonymous. Unused or expired pills, patches and liquid prescriptions (in their sealed original container) will be accepted. Needles and sharp items will not be accepted. No questions will be asked. > Read more.

Henrico home sales rose in March

Parts of the greater Richmond real estate market experienced an increase in the number of homes sold during the month of March, according to Long & Foster.

The number of homes sold increased in much of the Richmond region in March compared to year-ago levels. In Henrico County, the number of homes rose by 16 percent. Median sale prices varied in the Richmond region in March when compared to the same month last year. In both Hanover and Henrico counties, the median sale price rose by 10 percent. > Read more.

Henrico house fire contained quickly


APR. 24, 9:15 A.M. – A house fire in Henrico's West End Sunday caused minor damage but resulted in no injuries. At about noon Sunday, Henrico Emergency Communications Officers received phone calls of smoke coming from a home in the 1700 block of Shewalt Circle, just one block off Hungary Road. > Read more.

Business in brief


The Jenkins Foundation has granted The McShin Foundation $25,000 for residential recovery services to serve those with a Substance Use Disorder. The Jenkins Foundation is focused on equitable access to health care services, as well as programs that help reduce risky behaviors and promote safe and healthy environments. The McShin Foundation was founded in 2004 and is Virginia's leading non-profit, full-service Recovery Community Organization (RCO), committed to serving individuals and families in their fight against Substance Use Disorders. > Read more.
Community

YMCA event will focus on teen mental health


The YMCA, in partnership with the Cameron K. Gallagher Foundation and PartnerMD, will host a free event May 2 to help parents learn how to deal with teen mental health issues. “When the Band-Aid Doesn’t Fix It: A Mom’s Perspective on Raising a Child Who Struggles” will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Shady Grove Family YMCA,11255 Nuckols Road. The event will focus on education, awareness, and understanding the issues facing teens today. > Read more.

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.
Entertainment

Restaurant Watch


Find out how your favorite dining establishments fared during their most recent inspections by the Virginia Department of Health. > Read more.

 

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The Modlin Center for the Arts at the University of Richmond will broadcast Bolshoi Ballet’s production of “Contemporary Evening” at 12:55 p.m. in Camp Concert Hall, Booker Hall of Music. Pathe Live's Bolshoi Ballet program brings the best Bolshoi Ballet productions direct from Moscow, Russia to cinemas and performing arts centers across the U.S. Each production features behind-the-scenes programming, including interviews with the cast and creative teams, either prior to the start of the production, or during intermission. Tickets are $7 to $14. For details, call 289-8980 or visit http://www.modlin.richmond.edu. Full text

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