Henrico County VA

County to legislature: ‘Don’t hurt us’

"Don't hurt us."

That's the clear and simple message being delivered by Henrico County's elected officials, administrators and lobbyists to the General Assembly, which convened in Richmond for a 60-day session last week.

The missive represents a change from years past, during which county officials annually presented "wish lists" of top priorities to the county's General Assembly delegation. Six years ago, that list contained 14 items. This year, it's down to just one: Do no harm.

By placing their sole focus on those three words, local officials hope to make a salient point to lawmakers: localities – Henrico included – are struggling to deal with their own financial problems and cannot afford additional funding cuts from the state.

County lobbyists have, for the most part, kept their mouths shut in recent years as state funding to localities have declined annually. Though other jurisdictions in the state had to lay off employees, raise tax rates or trim services – or all three – Henrico has not.

County officials are adamant that no layoffs, service cuts or tax increases will occur in the coming fiscal year either, but by sounding the warning bell to legislators, they hope to illustrate how dire times have gotten statewide.

During the past several years, as state funding to localities fell during the recession, Henrico was able to make up those lost funds in its annual budgets thanks to years of conservative financial planning, Deputy County Manager and Finance Director John Vithoulkas said. (The county annually has capped its growth at 5 percent – during strong and lean economic years – which helped buffer it from the recession.)

But now, the state's failure to meet its funding obligations is having a real impact even on Henrico, which begins its 2012-13 budget process facing a $70.8 million budget shortfall before the process even begins. That's a significant hurdle even for one of the most fiscally sound counties in the nation (Henrico was the first county to have its triple AAA bond rating reaffirmed last summer after the U.S. government's rating was downgraded by Standard and Poor's.)

The shortfall is the result of a combination of factors:

• an estimated $10.8-million decline in tax revenues;

• a projected increase of $32.5 million in the county's required payments to the Virginia Retirement System;

• $6.1 million in additional debt service payments;

• $10.2 million in operating costs for new projects constructed through bond sales;

• $4.2 million in additional healthcare costs;

• $1.5 million in additional diesel fuel for school buses and vehicles;

• $5.5 million in other costs.

"In the Fiscal Year '13 budget, the VRS cost increase is the single largest budget driver that we have, both for general government and for schools," Vithoulkas said.

The VRS provides retirement payments for eligible state employees and teachers and is funded by the state and localities, all of whom make payments into one fund, from which it is then distributed.

But while localities – including Henrico – have been required annually to fully fund the VRS rates established by the VRS Board, the state has not fully funded its share in any of the past four-plus years.

For example, in Fiscal Year 10-11, the VRS board set the rate of payment into the system for teachers at 12.91 percent; Henrico and other localities paid that percentage in full, but the state paid only 3.93 percent – less than one-third of the amount it owed.

Part of the problem was that the VRS investment fund took a significant hit during the recession, losing 28 percent of its value between 2007 and 2009. The fund rebounded to gain 20 percent last year; Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell's budget assumes that the fund will show 8-percent growth in the coming fiscal year.

McDonnell has proposed funding the VRS with $2.21 billion in new money in the coming fiscal year – including $876 million in state general fund dollars – as a way to begin addressing what he termed the "woefully underfunded" system. McDonnell also is proposing that public employees pay 1 percent of their salaries toward the fund, which would raise another $5.1 billion.

Critics of his proposals argue that the bulk of that new money will come from the very localities who have been paying their shares all along and from employees, for whom the money is intended.

A number of bills related to VRS funding are under consideration in the Assembly, but each would require concessions in other areas to fund VRS.

"There are only so many resources," said Henrico's legislative liaison Mike Schnurmann. "If you squeeze in over here, it's going to pop out somewhere."

Positives and negatives
The county has seen some key economic indicators pointing in a positive direction during the past year:

• residential foreclosures in 2011, through October, were lower than during the same months in 2010 with just two exceptions (May, which witnessed one more and October, which was equal to the previous year);

• the county's unemployment rate dropped from 7.5 percent in February 2010 to 5.9 percent in April 2011, before rising slightly to 6.5 percent in September – a figure that still was 0.8 percent lower than the same rate for Metro Richmond;

• the county's sales tax receipts were up $2.5 million from Fiscal Year 2009-10 to FY 2010-11 (to $57.2 million) and up 2.9 percent during the first quarter of FY 11-12.

But, there are negatives too.

County officials are estimating that Henrico's taxable real estate base will drop from $31.7 billion last year to $30.05 billion this year – a decrease of 5.19 percent. Since 2009, the taxable base has dropped by $4.7 billion (or 13.5 percent).

Other local sources of revenue – chiefly personal and business property taxes – are projected to remain flat in the coming fiscal year.

Also during this year's Assembly session, legislators will consider a number of proposals to restructure the way road maintenance is handled throughout the state. Henrico – one of just two localities that already maintain their own secondary road systems with money provided by the state – will watch the issue carefully, said Schnurmann.

Henrico – which for years lobbied to have its road maintenance allocation rate increased to bring it more in line with that of Arlington County – may now be content to live with its current rate, given that all but one of the new proposals likely would reduce that rate even further, according to Schnurmann.

County officials don't expect any of the proposals to pass the General Assembly this year, but they caution that anything is possible.
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Community

Anthem ‘LemonAid’ registration opens


Last summer, hundreds of Anthem LemonAid stands dotted Central Virginia and raised more than $100,000 in support of cancer treatment and research at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU (CHoR). This July 17-19, Anthem is inviting community members to host an Anthem LemonAid stand in support of the children who are battling the disease. During the past 13 summers, Anthem LemonAid has raised more than $1 million. All funds raised support the Hematology and Oncology Clinic at the Children's Hospital of Richmond at VCU.

Anthem LemonAid is Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals’ signature summer event. It’s free to participate and is designed for children, families, community groups and businesses alike. > Read more.

Tree seedling giveaway planned April 2-3


The Henricopolis Soil & Water Conservation District will sponsor a tree seedling giveaway on April 2 at Dorey Park Shelter 1 from 2:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. and on April 3 at Hermitage High School parking lot from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Bare-root tree seedlings are available to Henrico County residents free of charge for the spring planting season.

The following seedling species will be available: apple, kousa dogwood, red maple, river birch, red osier dogwood, loblolly pine, sycamore, bald cypress, white dogwood and redbud. Quantities are limited and trees are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Each participant is allowed up to 10 trees total, not to include more than five of the same species. > Read more.

State provides online directory of Bingo games


Wondering where to go to play Bingo? Wonder no more.

The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) recently launched an online directory of permitted bingo games played in Virginia. Listed by locality, more than 400 regular games are available across the state. The directory will be updated monthly and can be found on VDACS’ website at http://www.vdacs.virginia.gov/gaming/index.shtml.

“Many Virginia charities, including volunteer rescue squads, booster clubs and programs to feed the homeless, use proceeds from charitable gaming as a tool to support their missions, said Michael Menefee, program manager for VDACS’ Office of Charitable and Regulatory Programs. > Read more.

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Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


It’s that time of year – charity races are popping up everywhere! On Saturday, St. Joseph’s Villa will be the site of the sixth annual CASA Superhero Run and the fifth annual Richmond Free to Breathe Run/Walk will be held in Innsbrook. Also in Innsbrook, the 2015 Richmond Take Steps for Crohn’s and Colitis will take place on Sunday. If you’re more into relaxation than exercise, check out Wine for Cure’s Dogwood Wine Festival or the Troubadours Community Theatre Group’s production of “West Side Story” at the Henrico Theatre. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


There are several fun events this weekend taking place outside including the third annual Virginia Firefighter Games at Short Pump Town Center; Twin Hickory Park’s “April Showers: A Celebration of Spring” event; the Young Life Richmond West 5k in Innsbrook; and the Gold Festival on Broad which benefits Prevent Child Abuse Virginia. Fingers crossed for no rain! For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


The University of Richmond will host its annual Global Family Concert this weekend – a free, family friendly concert featuring Japanese, Indonesian, West African, Indian, and Brazilian music and dance performances. Country music fans can head to The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen for “An Evening of Country” featuring The Honky Tonk Experience. Enjoy the spring weather at Meadow Farm for “Sheep to Shawl” or join the Henrico Hiking Club at James River Park. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

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The movie “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” (PG-13) will play at 7 p.m. May 1 and at 2 p.m. May 2 at Henrico Theatre, 305 E. Nine Mile Rd.… Full text

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