Bill would offer mothers a baby’s DNA sample

Virginia hospitals will have to offer new mothers a take-home DNA sample from their baby under a bill approved at the request of the forensic sleuth who inspired the fictional crime fighter, Dr. Kay Scarpetta.

Both chambers of the General Assembly unanimously approved House Bill 1836, sponsored by Delegate John O’Bannon, R-Henrico. The bill now goes to Gov. Bob McDonnell to be signed into law.

O’Bannon said the bill will give families a way to identify their child if something happens to the youngster.

“I feel it is something important,” O’Bannon said. “It is just a good thing to do.”

The baby’s DNA will come from a blood sample taken during the regular newborn screening. The blood can be taken from either a stick on the bottom of the infant’s foot or from “cord blood” – the blood taken from the infant’s umbilical cord. The blood then would be put on a blot sheet for the family to take home and keep.

The bill requires hospitals to offer the DNA sample, but that does not mean the mother must say yes. If a mother objects to having the blood sample taken, the hospital will not collect it.

O’Bannon brought the legislation before the General Assembly on behalf of Dr. Marcella Fierro, Virginia’s former chief medical examiner. Fierro performed autopsies and identifications on people who died in Virginia for 34 years. She was the inspiration for Dr. Kay Scarpetta, the lead character in Patricia Cornwell’s best-selling crime novels.

Fierro said her retirement in 2008 gave her the time she needed to work on passing this legislation. She said the DNA is important because there are few ways to identify young children. Hospitals take footprints from newborns, but Fierro said those can be useless.

“In 34 years as a medical examiner, I have never been able to identify someone from a footprint,” Fierro said.

She also noted that if a child is adopted, the adopted family’s DNA can’t be used to help with identification.

HB 1836 faced some opposition on its journey through the assembly. Fierro said the Virginia Healthcare Association was opposed at first. The group was concerned about costs and liability if medical complications occurred when a hospital drew an infant’s blood.

Fierro said the sample would cost less than $1, and she dismissed the concerns over liability.

“[Hospitals] have a hundred opportunities a day to kill you with errors, and they don’t. I would trust them 100 percent to take a blood sample,” Fierro said.

The association eventually changed its position and supported the bill.

On the Senate floor, Sen. Donald McEachin, D-Richmond, challenged the language of the proposed law, which consists of just 30 words:

“Every hospital providing maternity care shall offer to obtain a sample of blood from an infant born at the hospital and provide that sample to the mother of the infant.”

McEachin suggested that the bill may be unconstitutional because it says “mother.” He proposed an amendment to change that gender-specific word to “known parents.” The amendment was rejected, and McEachin voted in favor of the bill anyway.

O’Bannon said HB 1836 specified mother because the blood sample would be taken right after the child is born while the mother is in the room with the baby.

The only state with a law similar to HB 1836 is Florida, where 41 hospitals offer blood samples.

If the governor signs the bill, Virginia’s law will take effect in July 2012.

To track or comment on House Bill 1836, visit http://www.richmondsunlight.com/bill/2011/hb1836
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

State Police urge motorists to #MoveOver during Memorial Day weekend

Memorial Day signifies the official start of summer, and Virginia State Police officials are urging motorists to "do what’s right when they see lights" and move over.

The “Move Over” law is a lifesaving law intended to protect public safety professionals and highway workers who help to maintain the safety of the Commonwealth’s roads. State Police are using the #MoveOver hashtag on social media to promote the law. > Read more.

Henrico to hold June 8 open house on Route 5 Corridor/Marion Hill study

The Henrico County Planning Department will hold an open house Thursday, June 8 for residents and other members of the public to provide input for a study of the Route 5 Corridor/Marion Hill areas.

The open house will be held from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Varina Area Library, 1875 New Market Road. The meeting’s informal structure will allow the public to attend at their convenience and to ask questions and discuss the study one on one with Planning staff. > Read more.

Henrico real estate staying strong despite low inventory

The Henrico real estate market has been relatively strong for the past month, despite a lower amount of inventory, according to data from Long and Foster Real Estate.

In the past month, 408 homes have been sold in Henrico, which is 2 percent less than were sold in the same timeframe in 2016.

Last year the median sale prices for Henrico homes was $219,975, whereas this month it's up to $232,500, a 6 percent increase. Which means half of the homes in Henrico are priced above $232,500 and half are priced below. > Read more.

Smither named director of Henrico’s Department of Finance

Henrico County Manager John A. Vithoulkas has appointed Edward N. “Ned” Smither Jr. to serve as director of the Department of Finance, effective July 1.

Smither has served Henrico since 2013 as director of the Accounting Division in Finance. He will succeed Eugene H. Walter, who has delayed his retirement until June 30 to ensure an orderly transition within the department.
> Read more.

State honors EMS officials this week

There were nearly 1.5 million emergency medical services calls and 4,063 incidents per day in Virginia just last year.

This week, May 21-27, declared as National EMS week by Gov. Terry McAuliffe, recognizes the more than 34,000 EMS personnel and 631 agencies in the state and commends their efforts and commitment to Commonwealth citizens.
> Read more.

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The fifth annual Youth Triathlon, presented by Endorphin Fitness, will take place at 8 a.m. at the Virginia Home for Boys and Girls, 8716 West Broad St. The race is open to ages 5-14 and features a short pool swim, loop bike course closed to vehicular traffic, and a run on level playing fields. An optional four-day youth triathlon camp will precede the event, taking place Aug. 14-17 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. each day. Participants will be taught essential skills of the sport in a safe, fun environment. Cost of the camp is $95. All proceeds from the event will benefit the children at VHBG. For details, fee information and registration for the VHBG Youth Triathlon and camp, visit http://www.endorphinfitness.com/vhbg-youth-triathlon. For details about sponsoring or volunteering at the triathlon, contact Joan Marble at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Full text

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