Band of brothers

Among the Varsity Warriors who attended the May 5 spring breakfast were (from left) front row, kneeling – Tyler Howell and Brooks Ohman and back row – Rocky Marrin, Tom Bostwick, Colin Bennett, Jason Puckett, Max Huntley, and Jacob Butler.
Rocky Marrin spent 30 years of his life on a spending spree. Now he's on a mission not only to return the goods, but to help others avoid his buyer's remorse.

"I was buying what the world was selling," Marrin said of the three-decade period when his world revolved around climbing the corporate ladder, owning a nice home and cars, and seeking enjoyment in "drinking buddies, golf, sports, and women."

Yes, he went to church once a week, Marrin said; but all he had to show at the end of those 30 years was "a broken marriage, hurt and angry children, and a ton of confusion in every other area of my life."

In February 2010, after eight years in a men's Bible study, Marrin's prayers about a group that would help others avoid his mistakes evolved into a vision, and he founded White Hot Ministries. The fledgling organization works with both adult men and high school seniors in weekly study sessions in which members, using scripture as a guide, discuss feelings such as insecurity, pride, and fear, and topics such as addictions, dating and marriage.

On May 5, several Deep Run High School seniors attended the GodStrong Men spring breakfast at The Place at Innsbrook, and testified to the impact that their study group, known as the Varsity Warriors, has had on their lives.

Nothing to show for it
At the breakfast, the students heard from Pastor Calvin Duncan, who played basketball for Virginia Commonwealth University and later passed up a promising career in the NBA to join Athletes in Action, a Christian traveling team and sports ministry.

Now the pastor at Faith & Family Church in Richmond, Duncan told the crowd at the breakfast that if not for a woman on Grace Street who shared the gospel with him while he was at VCU, he might have chosen a different path.

Raised by an aunt with a sixth grade education after his mother died in childbirth, Duncan called himself a "typical inner city kid. I loved basketball; I didn't value education." In his junior year of high school, he dated a girl whose mother was a drug dealer, so he was always around gangsters and drugs.

But his aunt made him go to church, and basketball got him out of the inner city (although after a placement test pegged him at a fourth grade reading level, he had to detour to Oak Hill Academy on his way to VCU).

Duncan told the audience that he has never regretted his decision to pass up the pros, and quoted an observer who said, "Calvin turned out better than all these guys who played in the NBA, made millions of dollars, and have nothing to show for it."

"The Lord is our coach," Duncan told the crowd, comparing the Bible to the play books he once used in basketball. "You have to know the plays if you want to be successful in the game of life.

"I once was recruited to play basketball. Now I recruit sinners to be saved."

Sharing faith
Duncan was one of many speakers who have inspired the DRHS students at group get-togethers throughout the year, said Tom Bostwick, citing among other favorites Buddy Childress of Needle's Eye Ministries and Bill Janis, former Virginia delegate.

"I really look forward to [the weekly meetings]," said Bostwick. "The fellowship together, sharing problems, and having people help you with it."

"It's awesome to hear the different ways people come to God, and the different paths they take," said Colin Bennett, one of the students who helped Marrin recruit seniors for the study group. "They've all had different journeys, but they're all on the same path now."

Like Marrin, and his classmate Max Huntley, Bennett is a member at Shady Grove United Methodist Church. So once Marrin's plan for Varsity Warriors had taken shape, he was quick to approach Bennett and Huntley for help with recruitment.

"You don't find a lot of guys 17 or 18 years old who are willing to step out and share their faith," Marrin told the crowd at the breakfast, adding that he originally hoped for 12 students to sign on, and perhaps eight to attend regularly.

But some 16 seniors, on average, have attended the meetings at Marrin's home -- and are now recruiting juniors to form next year's group. Although all are students at DRHS, they hail from seven different churches.

The men also take turns leading the weekly lesson and "wrapping Scripture around it," said Marrin. "I haven't led a lesson since the second week in December."

Roots-up growth
Although all of the Varsity Warriors attend the same high school, they vary greatly in their interests and activities outside of the group.

Bostwick plays lacrosse and will head to DePaul in the fall to study history. Tyler Howell works at Chick-Fil-A and will study business at James Madison University. Jason Puckett, a basketball player, will study business at Virginia Tech, and Bennett, who works at Chick-Fil-A, will attend University of Maryland. A member of the golf team, Huntley works at Daylight Donuts and will major in global affairs at George Mason University.

But all of the seniors agree on one thing: Varsity Warriors has brought them closer, and has helped prepare them to make better choices in life.

"As we're maturing, we're learning," said Jacob Butler. "It's a good combination to make good decisions."

"I feel like I take time to think before I do things, and I pray over things more," agreed Howell, adding that he feels "refreshed" after leaving Varsity Warriors meetings. "It's a support system."

"It's helped me with stress, and school work, and managing time," said Brooks Ohman. "And it's helped me grow very close to my friends."

As Huntley pointed out, "We were all friends before, but we've gotten closer friends, through God and religion."

Studying scripture together builds tighter bonds than those of a typical friendship, agreed Bennett. "When you come together through Christ, it's not a superficial growth," he said. "It's more roots-up --- a stronger, sturdy growth."

Lofty goals
Although Marrin has already looked into establishing Varsity Warrior groups in other high schools and cities, and many of the students plan to form groups at their colleges, his vision for the organization is considerably more ambitious.

"We want to take this," he told the breakfast audience, "to every high school in the country."

Marrin and his wife, Leslie (who cooks for the senior men and talks to them about prom night and dating topics), also hope to expand the groups to include women. Leslie is organizing a senior girls study group, and the couple is actively seeking leaders to help spread groups of both genders to other high school campuses.

But even in its infancy, Varsity Warriors has had a tremendous impact on 16 lives already.

"When Colin and Max came to me [about Varsity Warriors]," Bostwick said, "I had no idea what I was getting into. I went to church every week and thought my faith was pretty strong. Now we've all grown together, and I'm so thankful. Varsity Warriors is a big part of my life."

Being a high school senior, Bennett mused, he knows a lot of people -- most of whom will not be a part of his life for much longer. But because of Varsity Warriors, Bennett said, "There are 15 people my age that I know I'll be friends with my whole life. Because when you share your faith, it's a good foundation."

As Howell addressed the crowd, he noted that Varsity Warriors has helped him overcome a number of fears -- including the fear of public speaking that he had to overcome to get up on stage.

"[Varsity Warriors] has been a steadfast rock in my life when so many things are flying by," Howell said, adding that even when he was away from the group, the support of other members felt like "a backpack of friends and family" on his back.

"I will miss Mondays with Varsity Warriors -- and Leslie's cooking," Howell concluded with a smile.

"We truly became a family this year."

For details about Varsity Warriors and White Hot Ministries visit http://www.godstrongmen.org, email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), or call 912-6263. The fall breakfast is scheduled for Oct. 13 and Boyd Dowler, who played tight end under Vince Lombardi, will be the featured speaker.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

‘Hello Kitty Truck’ rolls into Short Pump Saturday


MAR. 23, 12 P.M. – Hello Kitty fans, rejoice. On Saturday, the Hello Kitty Cafe Truck, described as “a mobile vehicle of cuteness,” will make its first visit to the region.

The truck will be at Short Pump Town Center, 11800 W. Broad St., from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. The vehicle will be near the mall’s main entrance by Crate & Barrel and Pottery Barn.

The Hello Kitty Cafe Truck has been traveling nationwide since its debut at the 2014 Hello Kitty Con, a convention for fans of the iconic character produced by the Japanese company Sanrio. > Read more.

Governor vetoes Republicans’ ‘educational choice’ legislation


Gov. Terry McAuliffe on Thursday vetoed several bills that Republicans say would have increased school choice but McAuliffe said would have undermined public schools.

Two bills, House Bill 1400 and Senate Bill 1240, would have established the Board of Virginia Virtual School as an agency in the executive branch of state government to oversee online education in kindergarten through high school. Currently, online courses fall under the Virginia Board of Education. > Read more.

School supply drive, emergency fund to help Baker E.S. students and faculty


Individuals and organizations wanting to help George F. Baker Elementary School students and staff recover from a March 19 fire at the school now have two ways to help: make a monetary donation or donate items of school supplies.

The weekend fire caused significant smoke-and-water damage to classroom supplies and student materials at the school at 6651 Willson Road in Eastern Henrico.

For tax-deductible monetary donations, the Henrico Education Foundation has created the Baker Elementary School Emergency School Supply Fund. > Read more.

Nominations open for 2017 IMPACT Award


ChamberRVA is seeking nominees for the annual IMPACT Award, which honors the ways in which businesses are making an impact in the RVA Region economy and community and on their employees.

Nominees must be a for-profit, privately-held business located within ChamberRVA's regional footprint: the counties of Charles City, Chesterfield, Goochland, Hanover, Henrico, New Kent and Powhatan; the City of Richmond; and the Town of Ashland. > Read more.

Business in brief


Cushman & Wakefield | Thalhimer announces the sale of the former Friendly’s restaurant property located at 5220 Brook Road in Henrico County. Brook Road V, LLC purchased the 3,521-square-foot former restaurant property situated on 0.92 acres from O Ice, LLC for $775,000 as an investment. Bruce Bigger of Cushman & Wakefield | Thalhimer handled the sale negotiations on behalf of the seller. > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

CAT Theatre to present ‘When There’s A Will’


CAT Theatre and When There’s A Will director Ann Davis recently announced the cast for the dark comedy which will be performed May 26 through June 3.

The play centers around a family gathering commanded by the matriarch, Dolores, to address their unhappiness with Grandmother’s hold on the clan’s inheritance and her unreasonable demands on her family.

Pat Walker will play the part of Dolores Whitmore, with Graham and Florine Whitmore played by Brent Deekens and Brandy Samberg, respectively. > Read more.

 

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