Back in Action

A Grace Place was swirling with activity Sept. 16, as volunteers scattered throughout the Henrico facility – some with books to read, others with paintbrushes in hand – to share their time, talents and smiles with others.

It was all part of the Greater Richmond and Petersburg United Way’s annual Day of Action, during which some 300 volunteers teamed to visit 20 organizations throughout the region and lend their assistance in the form of 900 volunteer hours. The event signaled the kickoff of the United Way’s annual fundraising drive which this year seeks to raise $17 million for the local chapter and the charities to which it contributes.

At A Grace Place, volunteers from Owens and Minor, Sun Trust and Dominion broke into several groups to help clients prepare for a fashion show the next day; host a jazz trivia event for others; paint an area in need of sprucing up; and lend their smiles and assistance to AGP’s clients and staff members.

“It’s a way for volunteers to get a firsthand look at what they can do for the United Way,” said Lynne Seward, CEO of A Grace Place.

A Grace Place, a non-profit organization founded in 1969, provides daytime health services, support and activities for adults who have a wide range of special needs – from those with mental handicaps such as dementia and autism to those with disabilities and senior citizens with chronic conditions. Its 229 clients come from all over the Metro Richmond region, their visits covered fully or partially by Medicaid in most cases and by scholarships in others. Its Board of Directors is composed entirely of volunteers.

The organization considers itself fortunate to have a strong group of corporate partners, including those who visited during last month’s Day of Action, as well as Genworth and Altria, Seward said. Local schools, including Collegiate, St. Christopher’s and VCU, also send students to research and volunteer at AGP.

“It’s great that corporations give time like this,” Seward said, gesturing toward a group of volunteers from Owens and Minor as they took a group photograph before setting off to mingle with clients. “They go back to work with renewed energy.”

The average client at A Grace Place receives services there for about a decade, Seward said. The organization usually has a handful of open spots, but Seward realizes that for each person it helps, countless others in the community are going without that same type of care. There simply aren’t enough options available to provide care for the growing number of people afflicted with various conditions, including Alzheimer’s, she said.

“We don’t know where [many of them] are getting care right now,” Seward said.    

A Grace Place is adding services so that it will be able to accept more adults with autism and Alzheimer’s. But, “the issue is funding,” she said. The United Way’s annual donations help – A Grace Place received more than $122,000 during its Fiscal Year 2008-09 – but funding from other sources continues to slide.

In one room last month, clients with dementia listened intently, smiles creeping across several of their faces, as a volunteer read a Dr. Seuss story. The room, decorated in soft tones and with children’s furniture, is designed to provide clients with a sense of their own childhood years.

Age Wave Planning
With United Way and Senior Connections, The Capital Area Agency on Aging, leading the way, a number of public and private organizations and businesses recently joined together to initiate the Greater Richmond Age Wave program, which seeks to prepare the region for the anticipated population boom among senior citizens. Projections show that the number of adults 65 and older in Virginia will double to 700,000 or 800,000 within 20 years, creating a broad range of needs – and opportunities.

“We’re already not meeting the needs of people today,” said Lea Setegn, spokeswoman for the United Way. “What are we going to do when it doubles?”

The project seeks to identify potential challenges associated with the growing senior population – such as the need for affiliated services and long-term care options – identify gaps in the system and make recommendations about how to fill them.

Perhaps most troubling to those like Seward who see the effects firsthand is that most families are uninformed about the options that exist for their family members.

“Families are totally caught off-guard,” she said. “People don’t plan – for retirement or for their own future fees.”

But A Grace Place also experiences the flip side of the growing population. It enjoys support from a number of volunteers who are themselves part of the Baby Boomers generation, Seward said.

“Baby boomers are changing everything that they touch,” she said. “We have boomers who come in and don’t only volunteer but invent new programs.”
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Therapeutic healing


In a room labeled the garden room, a bright space with lavender-colored walls and pebble-gray chairs, art therapist Becky Jacobson might ask her patients to imagine a safe place, but she doesn’t ask them to describe it to her — she wants them to draw it.

The patients are free to draw whatever they envision, expressing themselves through their colored markers, a form of healing through art therapy.

“Some people might not feel safe anywhere because they have had hard things happening to them, and I have the background to help that person reground and feel safe in the group,” Jacobson said. > Read more.

Eight’s enough? Crowded race for 56th District develops


Following the retirement of Delegate Peter Farrell [R-56th District], a number of candidates have thrown their hats into the ring to vie for the open seat in the Virginia General Assembly district, which contains a portion of Henrico’s Far West End.

Democratic challengers include Lizzie Basch and Melissa Dart, while Republican contenders include George Goodwin, Matt Pinsker, Graven Craig, Surya Dhakar, Jay Prendergrast and John McGuire. In addition to a section of Henrico, the district also includes portions of Goochland and Spotsylvania County, as well as all of Louisa County. > Read more.

On the trail to Awareness


Twenty-five teams, composed of some 350 participants, gathered at Dorey Park in Varina April 8 for the Walk Like MADD 5k, to benefit Mothers Against Drunk Driving Virginia. The event raised more than $35,000, with more funds expected to come in through May 7. > Read more.

Leadership Metro Richmond honors St. Joseph’s Villa CEO


Leadership Metro Richmond honored St. Joseph's Villa CEO Kathleen Burke Barrett, a 2003 graduate of LMR, with its 2017 Ukrop Community Vision Award during its annual spring luncheon April 6.

The award honors a LMR member who demonstrates a purposeful vision, a sense of what needs to be done, clear articulation with concern and respect for others with demonstrated action and risk-taking. > Read more.

Glen Allen H.S. takes second in statewide economics competition

Glen Allen H.S. was among six top schools in the state to place in the 2017 Governor’s Challenge in Economics and Personal Finance.

Taught by Patricia Adams, the Glen Allen H.S. team was runner-up in the Economics division, in which teams faced off in a Quiz Bowl. > Read more.

Henrico Business Bulletin Board

April 2017
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The 2017 Central Virginia Corks & Taps Festival will take place rain or shine from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Innsbrook Pavilion. This year’s event will showcase 10 wineries and seven craft breweries and cideries from around the Commonwealth, live music, food and beverage concessions, specialty-item and arts and crafts vendors and more. Proceeds will benefit the general scholarship and endowment funds for the Richmond Chapter of the Virginia Tech Alumni Association. For details and to purchase advance tickets, visit http://www.centralvirginiacorksandtaps.com. Full text

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