Back in Action

A Grace Place was swirling with activity Sept. 16, as volunteers scattered throughout the Henrico facility – some with books to read, others with paintbrushes in hand – to share their time, talents and smiles with others.

It was all part of the Greater Richmond and Petersburg United Way’s annual Day of Action, during which some 300 volunteers teamed to visit 20 organizations throughout the region and lend their assistance in the form of 900 volunteer hours. The event signaled the kickoff of the United Way’s annual fundraising drive which this year seeks to raise $17 million for the local chapter and the charities to which it contributes.

At A Grace Place, volunteers from Owens and Minor, Sun Trust and Dominion broke into several groups to help clients prepare for a fashion show the next day; host a jazz trivia event for others; paint an area in need of sprucing up; and lend their smiles and assistance to AGP’s clients and staff members.

“It’s a way for volunteers to get a firsthand look at what they can do for the United Way,” said Lynne Seward, CEO of A Grace Place.

A Grace Place, a non-profit organization founded in 1969, provides daytime health services, support and activities for adults who have a wide range of special needs – from those with mental handicaps such as dementia and autism to those with disabilities and senior citizens with chronic conditions. Its 229 clients come from all over the Metro Richmond region, their visits covered fully or partially by Medicaid in most cases and by scholarships in others. Its Board of Directors is composed entirely of volunteers.

The organization considers itself fortunate to have a strong group of corporate partners, including those who visited during last month’s Day of Action, as well as Genworth and Altria, Seward said. Local schools, including Collegiate, St. Christopher’s and VCU, also send students to research and volunteer at AGP.

“It’s great that corporations give time like this,” Seward said, gesturing toward a group of volunteers from Owens and Minor as they took a group photograph before setting off to mingle with clients. “They go back to work with renewed energy.”

The average client at A Grace Place receives services there for about a decade, Seward said. The organization usually has a handful of open spots, but Seward realizes that for each person it helps, countless others in the community are going without that same type of care. There simply aren’t enough options available to provide care for the growing number of people afflicted with various conditions, including Alzheimer’s, she said.

“We don’t know where [many of them] are getting care right now,” Seward said.    

A Grace Place is adding services so that it will be able to accept more adults with autism and Alzheimer’s. But, “the issue is funding,” she said. The United Way’s annual donations help – A Grace Place received more than $122,000 during its Fiscal Year 2008-09 – but funding from other sources continues to slide.

In one room last month, clients with dementia listened intently, smiles creeping across several of their faces, as a volunteer read a Dr. Seuss story. The room, decorated in soft tones and with children’s furniture, is designed to provide clients with a sense of their own childhood years.

Age Wave Planning
With United Way and Senior Connections, The Capital Area Agency on Aging, leading the way, a number of public and private organizations and businesses recently joined together to initiate the Greater Richmond Age Wave program, which seeks to prepare the region for the anticipated population boom among senior citizens. Projections show that the number of adults 65 and older in Virginia will double to 700,000 or 800,000 within 20 years, creating a broad range of needs – and opportunities.

“We’re already not meeting the needs of people today,” said Lea Setegn, spokeswoman for the United Way. “What are we going to do when it doubles?”

The project seeks to identify potential challenges associated with the growing senior population – such as the need for affiliated services and long-term care options – identify gaps in the system and make recommendations about how to fill them.

Perhaps most troubling to those like Seward who see the effects firsthand is that most families are uninformed about the options that exist for their family members.

“Families are totally caught off-guard,” she said. “People don’t plan – for retirement or for their own future fees.”

But A Grace Place also experiences the flip side of the growing population. It enjoys support from a number of volunteers who are themselves part of the Baby Boomers generation, Seward said.

“Baby boomers are changing everything that they touch,” she said. “We have boomers who come in and don’t only volunteer but invent new programs.”
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Henrico woman earns national pharmacy fellowship


Henrico County native Nilofar “Nellie” Jafari recently was named the American College of Clinical Pharmacy-American Society of Health-System Pharmacists-Virginia Commonwealth University Congressional Healthcare Policy Fellow for 2017-18.

Jafari is a 2007 graduate of J.R. Tucker High School.

Pharmacists selected for the fellowship have the opportunity to gain real-world insight into health care policy analysis and development via immersion in the congressional environment. > Read more.

Section of Lauderdale Drive to be closed April 26 for drainage improvements


The westbound lanes of Lauderdale Drive will be closed between John Rolfe Parkway and Cambridge Drive on Wednesday, April 26 for drainage improvements.

The lanes are expected to be closed from approximately 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Motorists will be detoured from westbound Lauderdale onto John Rolfe, Gayton Road and Cambridge before being directed back onto Lauderdale. > Read more.

Henrico Police to host prescription drug take-back event April 29


The Henrico County Division of Police and the U. S. Drug Enforcement Administration will participate in the nationwide Prescription Drug Take Back Program Saturday, April 29. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Henrico County Training Center, 7701 East Parham Road, next to the Public Safety Building.

The program is free and anonymous. Unused or expired pills, patches and liquid prescriptions (in their sealed original container) will be accepted. Needles and sharp items will not be accepted. No questions will be asked. > Read more.

Henrico home sales rose in March

Parts of the greater Richmond real estate market experienced an increase in the number of homes sold during the month of March, according to Long & Foster.

The number of homes sold increased in much of the Richmond region in March compared to year-ago levels. In Henrico County, the number of homes rose by 16 percent. Median sale prices varied in the Richmond region in March when compared to the same month last year. In both Hanover and Henrico counties, the median sale price rose by 10 percent. > Read more.

Henrico house fire contained quickly


APR. 24, 9:15 A.M. – A house fire in Henrico's West End Sunday caused minor damage but resulted in no injuries. At about noon Sunday, Henrico Emergency Communications Officers received phone calls of smoke coming from a home in the 1700 block of Shewalt Circle, just one block off Hungary Road. > Read more.
Community

YMCA event will focus on teen mental health


The YMCA, in partnership with the Cameron K. Gallagher Foundation and PartnerMD, will host a free event May 2 to help parents learn how to deal with teen mental health issues. “When the Band-Aid Doesn’t Fix It: A Mom’s Perspective on Raising a Child Who Struggles” will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Shady Grove Family YMCA,11255 Nuckols Road. The event will focus on education, awareness, and understanding the issues facing teens today. > Read more.

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.
Entertainment

Restaurant Watch


Find out how your favorite dining establishments fared during their most recent inspections by the Virginia Department of Health. > Read more.

 

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"Comparing Eastern and Western Astrology" by Randy Goldberg is the focus of a workshop sponsored by the Richmond Chapter of the National Council for Geocosmic Research (NCGR) at 1 p.m. at the Weinstein JCC. Goldberg will compare and contrast the differences and similarities of Western astrology with that of the Indian Vedic Jyotish system, called the science of light. Admission is $20 for NCGR members and pre-registered guests, and $25 at the door. For details, contact Ruth Barrett at 740-1133 or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Full text

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