A Legacy Lives On

One of the traits that Ruth Hunter most admired about her Grandmother Bessie was her playful spirit.

Standing just 4 feet 11 inches in her black laced oxfords, Bessie Cramer Johnston loved to invent games and tell stories to entertain her grandchildren. On hot summer nights, says Hunter, Johnston would spread white sheets on the grass so the children could study the stars and wish on them. On cold nights, she would find icy windowpanes and spin yarns about Jack Frost.

"I grew up holding on to her apron, watching her cook and bake at the black iron wood stove," says Hunter, adding that one of the treats Bessie baked was lady fingers for impromptu tea parties.

Another trait that Hunter admired was Johnston's generosity and compassion for her fellow man – "especially those in need," emphasizes Hunter.

To her grandmother, says Hunter, "a hobo was only someone less fortunate and Jesus in disguise."

When Johnston owned the Clifton Bakery and Quick Lunch in Ashland during the 1920s, she would feed ministerial students from Randolph-Macon College at her own expense.

During the Depression, she collected clothes and food for the gypsies and their babies who camped in cars near Brook Road in Glen Allen. Once she had filled a wagon with her collection, the tiny woman would haul it to the gypsy camp, accompanied by her granddaughter.

"I was eight or nine," recalls Hunter. "I was probably almost as tall as she was."

So when it comes to honoring her grandmother's memory, it's only fitting that Hunter has echoed that generosity – and incorporated Grandmother Bessie's playfulness as well – by donating toys, dolls and other playthings to a Henrico museum.

On Nov. 24, Hunter visited Meadow Farm Museum to make her latest donation: a "Bessie doll" made in 1872, the same year her grandmother was born.

"She is a Grenier [doll]," says Hunter, "a homely doll [with a] papier mache head." Hunter believes Grandmother Bessie would approve of the doll's plain appearance, since Johnston – who was born in the Poconos near Stroudsburg, Pa. – used to call herself "the homeliest girl in the mountains."

Shoes and Thimbles
Perhaps it was Johnston's "homely" designation that helped make her so sensitive to the plight of others.

Bessie had a sister who was thought of as beautiful, says Hunter, and once told her granddaughter about family gifts received from an aunt when she was about 10.

Emma, the sister, received a beautiful doll; but it took Johnston awhile to find her gift.

"Finally, down in the very bottom of the package, was a little thimble for Bessie," says Hunter, adding that the sterling thimble is now cherished by her daughter-in-law.

But Bessie Johnston's faith undoubtedly contributed to her giving and compassionate nature as well. A devout Baptist, she was a charter member of Biltmore Baptist Church.

"Her credo," says Hunter, "was simple: to complain is an insult to God."

Johnston arrived in Ashland in 1911 when her husband moved his family to be near his father, H.C.N. Johnston of Passaic, New Jersey, who had bought the 300-acre Winn farm on Elmont Road a few years earlier.

Until she and her husband moved to Henrico County, sometime around 1927, Bessie operated the bakery on Railroad Avenue.

Hunter has written about the lunch spot in a commemorative book marking the town of Ashland's 150th anniversary.

"I am told she is written up in the annals of [Randolph-Macon College] for her contributions to the well-being of the students," writes Hunter.  "The menu included soups, sandwiches and pies of many flavors.

"Bessie was a Yankee and had never heard of grits or collards, so she cooked or baked what was familiar to her: foods of Pennsylvania.   Her heritage, going back to early American days, was German, English, Dutch, Swiss and possibly a little French thrown in."


Ruth Hunter's special connection with her grandmother may have reached a peak, however, in her third grade year.

"We wore the same shoe size [that year]," she says, "so she ordered us shoes form the Spiegel catalog – exactly alike!"

"I sometimes wondered," says Hunter, "if she loved me only because I was the child of her cherished daughter. But she loved everyone – except the doctor who called me homely when comparing me to my prettier mother."

Billy Goats and Buckets
As a family, the Hunters have a long history with Meadow Farm. 

Hunter's son, Robert Jr., did archaeology digs on the grounds as a student, and described the farm experience in his graduate dissertation at the College of William and Mary.

Hunter was born just a few miles away from Meadow Farm, near Mountain Road, in 1928.

At the presentation of the Bessie doll, Johnston's great-granddaughter Debbie Frost Bohn joined her cousin Ruth, and they discussed the legions of relatives who have lived in the Meadow Farm area for decades.

Bohn recounted stories she heard as a child from her own grandmother "about the ladies getting off at the train station in their big dresses, going to big balls at the Forest Lodge." Bohn has recently taken an interest in the family history, and credits Hunter for helping her learn more about the Johnstons and other ancestors.

"[So] many generations of my family have grown up here, and still go to Glen Allen Church," says Bohn. "We all lived on Blackburn. My mother – Bessie's granddaughter – still lives here. It's all still connected."

In addition to the Bessie doll, Hunter and her family have presented Meadow Farm with several other items over the years: blacksmith tools, brass buckets, fireplace and farm tools, and a hide-covered trunk lined with early newspapers – all in keeping with the farm's 19th-century origins.

On Hunter's 81st birthday, her grandchildren presented “Billy” for placement in the children’s bedroom in the circa 1860 farmhouse.  “Billy” the goat, a late 19th-century riding toy with iron wheels and a brass bell at his neck, had enjoyed many years as a decoration in the Hunter home.

"Rather than try and put the goat on a gift list," says Hunter, "since more than one of our children may want it – and like Solomon we cannot cut him in half – we like the thought of the public enjoying Billy in the old farmhouse."

As she was with the riding goat, Hunter is happy to make a home for the Bessie doll, and to honor once again the memory of her grandmother.

Even after all these years, says Hunter, Johnston has a powerful everyday influence on her. Whenever she feels the urge to whine or complain, for instance, she hears
her grandmother's voice admonishing her.

"Today, every trip I make to the compost pile with vegetable scraps, or to tend the herbs, or bake bread from scratch, or love a grandchild – I think of my grandmother," says Hunter. "To emulate her in small ways is all I can accomplish.

"I tell you," she adds wistfully, "I loved that little lady."

For more about Ruth Hunter and her museum donations, visit her blog at http://redhunter50.blogspot.
com/2009_11_01_archive.html.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

McAuliffe vetoes 6 more bills; GOP calls him ‘disengaged’


Gov. Terry McAuliffe on Monday vetoed six bills, including three Republicans said would help prevent voter fraud but the Democratic governor said would create barriers to voting.

McAuliffe has now vetoed 37 bills from the General Assembly’s 2017 session – and 108 during his four-year term as governor, surpassing any of his predecessors.

Republican legislative leaders say McAuliffe has broken his promise to be bipartisan, calling his office “the most disengaged administration we have ever worked with.” > Read more.

HSWCD to give away tree seedlings Thursday and Friday


Henricopolis Soil and Water Conservation District will hold its annual tree seedling giveaway March 30 at Dorey Park Shelter 1 from 2:30 to 6 p.m., and March 31 at Hermitage High School from 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Studies show that mature trees increase property value, decrease summertime cooling costs by providing shade, slow erosion and reduce flooding. They also provide homes for birds, food for countless creatures, and playgrounds for children. > Read more.

Dog rescued, no one injured in Northside townhouse fire


MAR. 27, 11 A.M. – No one was injured by a townhouse fire that occurred early Monday morning in the 200 block of Knightsmanor Court, near the intersection of Azalea Avenue and Richmond-Henrico Turnpike.

The first Henrico Fire officials were on scene in less than four minutes and found heavy smoke and flames coming from the two-story townhouse. Firefighters from the first-arriving fire engine and ladder truck made their way to the townhome involved in fire and searched for victims through high heat and reduced visibility. > Read more.

Walk, ceremony to observe Crime Victims’ Rights Week

In observance of National Crime Victims' Rights Week (April 2-8), and to honor victims of crime in Henrico County and raise awareness about crime victims' rights and issues, Henrico County Victim/Witness will hold a commemorative ceremony and informative walk April 5. > Read more.

Bon Secours announces Richmond OB-GYN expansion to Henrico County


Richmond OB-GYN, an obstetrics and gynecology provider of Bon Secours Richmond Health System, will open a new office at Bon Secours Heart and Vascular Institute building in Henrico County. The building, which serves as an extension of Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital, is located in Reynolds Crossing at Forest and Glenside Avenues. The practice opened for patients March 21.

Alice Hirata, M.D., joined the Bon Secours Medical Group and is now part of the physician team at Richmond OB-GYN, where she will help to establish a midwifery practice at St. Mary’s Hospital. > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

Metro Diner to open second Henrico location


Metro Diner, a comfort food concept, will open its second Henrico location next month. The company is accepting job applications for its Libbie Place location at 5626 West Broad Street. The diner concept, known for its fried chicken and waffles, meatloaf, and shrimp and grits, will bring 100 new jobs to the region as it plans to open its doors in April.

The 3,500-square-foot diner located in the Libbie Place Shopping Center will seat more than 100 and serve classic comfort food staples with a twist, such as fried chicken and waffles topped with strawberry butter and a stuffed challah bread French toast with strawberry and blueberry compote. > Read more.

 

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The Central Virginia Disaster Survivor Day training in Henrico County will be held from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Henrico Public Safety Training Center at 7701 E. Parham Rd. This free course is designed to introduce you to general emergency preparedness and safety information, and to provide each registered address a free backpack to take home and develop your own disaster survival kit. Learn about weather awareness, household safety, first aid and hygiene, planning and documents and basic active shooter awareness. For details, visit http://www.survivorday.com. Full text

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