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Marijuana decriminalization advocates unfazed

Advocates for the decriminalization of marijuana are disappointed in a legislative panel’s decision to kill a bill that would have shifted simple possession from a criminal conviction to a civil penalty.

House Bill 1443, sponsored by Delegate Harvey Morgan, R-Gloucester, sought to change the current punishment for simple marijuana possession – a $500 fine and a maximum of 30 days in jail – to a civil penalty carrying the fine only.

A subcommittee of the House Courts of Justice Committee recommended that the bill be “passed by indefinitely,” essentially killing it for this legislative session.

“It’s not a defeat or a loss,” said Dee Duffy, executive director of the Virginia branch of the National Association for the Reform of Marijuana Laws.

“Anytime we can get up and testify, it’s never a loss or a defeat.”

Her organization was part of a lobbying effort that encouraged supporters to attend the subcommittee’s Jan. 17 hearing. For Duffy, the hearing was an unpleasant reminder of last year, when the same criminal-law subcommittee killed Morgan’s 2010 bill decriminalizing marijuana.

“I think they knew exactly what they were doing before the committee even convened,” Duffy said. “They had no intention of passing it.”

For now, Duffy plans to work to mobilize voters for the upcoming House of Delegates election cycle.

“If you want to change the law,” she said, “you’ve got to change the lawmakers.”

Supporters of Morgan’s legislation want to see the criminal conviction done away with because of its effect on an offender’s permanent record. A drug charge can be a barrier to employment in many fields and can prevent students from receiving federal aid. The mere record of an arrest can be enough to cause problems.

“Punishments for possession of marijuana are far more dangerous than the drug itself. The policy ruins lives,” said Devon Tackels, president of the Virginia Commonwealth University chapter of Students for Sensible Drug Policy.

“We’ve got people who are going to become doctors, lawyers or teachers, and they’re seeing their futures slowly slip away based on one mistake,” Tackels said. “It’s really sad that we do that to people.”

His organization participated in lobbying efforts to support Morgan’s bill. Tackels attended the subcommittee hearing with several other SSDP members.

“It really hurt, after all the work we put in, to see the committee members – it was like the whole thing happened and they weren’t paying attention,” Tackels said.

Brooke Napier, SSDP policy specialist, shared that impression.

“They didn’t seem to take the issue very seriously,” she said.

Tackels said he would like to see more understanding and awareness of the issue from the elected representatives making the decision.

“The committee didn’t show the empathy I would have liked to have seen from somebody in a position of legislation power,” he said. “They just really didn’t seem to get it.”

Opponents of marijuana use believe the drug should remain illegal because it is dangerous. They say marijuana causes short-term memory loss and has mood-altering effects. On its website, the Foundation for a Drug-Free World lists anxiety, lowered reaction time and a reduced resistance to common illnesses as possible side effects of marijuana use.

Officials with the Drug Abuse Resistance Education echo those concerns. D.A.R.E. is a program led by police officers that teaches children how to resist peer pressure and live productive drug- and violence-free lives.

In an e-mail interview, Gene Ayers, the coordinator for D.A.R.E. in Virginia, said, “I realize there is a good deal of money being poured into the decriminalization of marijuana, but I think this would create many more problems than it could ever solve.”

HB 1443 would not legalize marijuana. Rather, it “changes the current $500 criminal fine for simple marijuana possession to a $500 civil penalty, eliminates the 30-day jail sentence, and eliminates the criminal conviction record that would follow a conviction for simple possession,” according to the description by the Legislative Information Service, the General Assembly’s record-keeping system.

“The bill changes none of the penalties for manufacture or distribution of marijuana. The bill continues to require forfeiture of the driver's license and drug screening and education for any minor found to have committed the violation of possession of marijuana and maintains all existing sanctions for all criminal violations involving marijuana.”

The Courts of Justice subcommittee agreed by voice vote to shelve the bill.

The bill may be done for this legislative session, but Napier sees a silver lining.

“I went away from this feeling disappointed in the representatives,” she said. “And it made me want to mobilize and fight harder.”

For the Record
On Jan. 17, the criminal-law subcommittee of the House Courts of Justice Committee recommended “passing by indefinitely” House Bill 1443, thus killing the proposal. The subcommittee took the action by voice vote; the Legislative Information Service, the General Assembly’s record-keeping system, does not show how the members voted.

Delegate Harvey Morgan, the bill’s sponsor, said all subcommittee members who were present supported the motion to kill HB 1443. Those members were Delegates David Albo, R-Springfield; Richard Bell, R-Staunton; Benjamin Cline, R-Amherst; Todd Gilbert, R-Woodstock; Charniele Herring, D-Alexandria; Jackson Miller, R-Manassas; Ron Villanueva, R-Virginia Beach; and Vivian Watts, D-Annandale.
Delegate Ward Armstrong, D-Martinsville, was absent at the time of the vote.

For more information on:
• the Virginia branch of the National Association for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, visit http://www.virginianorml.org.
• Students for Sensible Drug Policy, visit http://www.ssdp.org
• the Drug Abuse Resistance Education program, visit http://www.dare.com
• the Foundation for a Drug-Free World, visit http://www.drugfreeworld.org

To track or comment on Delegate Harvey Morgan’s bill to decriminalize simple possession of marijuana, visit http://www.richmondsunlight.com/bill/2011/hb1443
Community

Glen Allen student to perform at Carnegie Hall

Thanks to a first-place win in The American Protege International Vocal Competition 2014, Glen Allen High School student Matija Tomas will travel to New York City to perform at Carnegie Hall in December.

At the first-place winners recital in Weill Hall, Matija will perform Giacomo Puccini’s opera aria, “Chi il bel sogna di doretta.” She will perform with other vocalists from around the world and have the opportunity to win other awards and scholarships.

Locally, Thomas has performed with Richmond’s renowned Glorious Christmas Nights, Christian Youth Theatre, and WEAG’s Urban Gospel Youth Choir. > Read more.

Gayton Baptist Church dedicates new outreach center


The John Rolfe YMCA and Gayton Baptist Church have partnered in an effort to bring greater health and wellness opportunities to the community.

Through this partnership, the John Rolfe Y will run Youth Winter Sports programs, including basketball and indoor soccer, in Gayton’s newly renovated $5.5 million outreach center that features a new gymnasium, youth and teen space, social space with café, meeting space and full service commercial kitchen. > Read more.

Henricus Historical Park to host Publick Day Sept. 20

Henricus Historical Park will commemorate its anniversary during Publick Day, a signature annual event that celebrates the establishment of the second successful English settlement in the New World. In September 1611, Sir Thomas Dale, along with soldiers, tradesmen and farmers, ventured from Jamestown to create the Citie of Henricus. Leaders of Henricus developed the first English hospital, chartered the first college in North America, established tobacco as the first cash crop in Virginia, and created a place where Pocahontas lived and met John Rolfe.

Publick Day will take place Saturday, Sept. 20, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free and parking is $5 per vehicle. > Read more.

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Entertainment

Extras sought for AMC’s ‘TURN’

Paid extras are being sought to appear in the AMC television series TURN: Washington's Spies, which will begin filming its second season in the Richmond area at the end of September and continue through February.

No experience is required, but producers say that extras must have flexible availability, reliable transportation and a positive attitude.

Arvold Casting is holding an open call on Sunday, Sept. 21 and is seeking men, women and children who are Caucasian, African American and Native American, with thin to average builds and who can realistically portray people living in Revolutionary War times. Long hair is a plus but not a must. > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


TGIF! Celebrate the weekend at Oak Hall Baptist Church’s Community Block Party on Saturday. Learn more about ballroom dancing, art and Colonial times. Or take the kids to Generation Z Games for water play or Southern Season to cook up a Disney-theme meal. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


Check out these three B’s in Henrico this weekend: books, bluegrass and “Born Yesterday.” Other activities to participate in – and feel good about – are the 15th annual James River Regional Cleanup and the 5th annual Richmond Out of the Darkness Community Walk. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

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Commonwealth Parenting will present “When Time Out Doesn’t Work” for parents of toddlers from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Children’s Museum of Richmond-Short Pump, 2200 Old Brick Rd.… Full text

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