Home for poor is rich in spirit

Jeanne Jugan would have been pleased by the scene.

The tree-lined campus of St. Joseph's Home for the Aged was littered with almost as many fun-lovers as fallen leaves. And they spanned the generations: from giggling children pitching beanbags to elderly nuns getting their first taste of cotton candy and residents tapping the arms of their wheelchairs in time with the Irish dancers on stage. Nearby, guests visited rows of tents to sample cuisine from Italy, Ireland, Australia, Vietnam, Spain, and other countries represented by the Little Sisters of the Poor, while children circulated from tent to tent to have their "passports" stamped.

For more than 30 years, the Little Sisters of the Poor have held a bazaar featuring hand-crafted items made by the residents, sisters, and volunteers.  This year, as the nursing home celebrates the 135th anniversary of the Little Sisters' arrival in Virginia, the event was expanded into a family festival with an international theme.

As always, proceeds from the fall event went to help the Little Sisters in their mission of serving the elderly poor. But the festival was designed to raise not only money, but community awareness. For even with the nursing home's location adjacent to Three Chopt Road – a Henrico main street – too many neighbors seem to have no idea it exists.

Even when people claim to know of the home, says development director Christy Heinen, they often confuse it with another institution bearing the St. Joseph's name.

"'Oh,’ they say, ‘you're that place on Brook Road!’” repeats Heinen with a smile, citing a typical reference to St. Joseph's Villa.

In addition to commemorating the Sisters' 135-year presence in Richmond, the festival also celebrated the recent canonization of the order's founder, Saint Jeanne Jugan.

For visitors who spent even a few moments of the festival touring the home, it was impossible to miss the many tributes to Jugan -- or the reverence for Jugan that pervades throughout.

"Since the canonization," says Sister Loretto, who supervises the nursing unit, "there's been a new enthusiasm and fervor. The spirit and work of our mother deepened our spiritual life.

"She saw the wrinkled, the lame, the sick -- and she saw Jesus in them."

Taking Needs to God
As a 16-year-old working as a maid for a wealthy French family, Jeanne Jugan often received beggars who came to the kitchen door, and joined her employers on their visits to the sick and poor.

Declining a marriage proposal at a young age, Jugan said, "God wants me for Himself. He is keeping me for a work which is not yet founded." After several years working at an overcrowded hospital, she began taking the elderly and ill into her own home. Eventually, Jugan and her companions purchased a former convent as their home; in 1852, they adopted the name Little Sisters of the Poor.

Today the Little Sisters carry on Jugan's tradition of going out into the streets to beg for food, supplies and money for the home. But where Jugan traveled on foot and carried a basket, and later sisters used a horse and buggy, Sister Marie Edward makes her rounds in a "begging van."

Only 40 percent of funds for the home are derived from the 96 residents' Medicaid and other forms of insurance. For the rest, says Heinen, the Sisters rely on charitable gifts – and the power of prayer.

Jeanne Jugan didn't believe in endowments, Heinen explains. She thought it showed a lack of faith in God to provide. "So there's this incredible reliance on St. Joseph," says Heinen, "and taking needs to God."

Does it work? Just ask Sister Loretto, who reels off a story about the time another home needed a horse for the begging wagon. One sister tore out an illustration of a horse to place under the statue of St. Joseph, but detached the tail of the horse in her haste. Soon after, a local farmer stopped by the home to offer a horse that was too old to use on the farm -- and the donated horse happened to be missing a tail.

In a St. Joseph's newsletter, Sister Colette recounts a story from 1968, before the home moved from downtown Richmond to Henrico.

"Mother wanted to have chicken for the residents on Sunday," writes Sister Colette. "I told her we didn't have any, [but] she said, 'St. Joseph will provide' . . . Wouldn't you know, Saturday a truck pulled up filled with fried chicken and cole slaw. . . A conference had been cancelled and they wanted to know if we could use the food!"

‘It Takes Hold of Your Heart’
Heinen, whose grandmother volunteered in the laundry at St. Joseph's Richmond site, has been hearing about the place since she was a girl. After volunteering, her grandmother would come to Heinen's home to help with the formidable task of ironing for the family of nine.

As a result, says Heinen, "I was so excited to come to work here. The love and faith filters throughout; it takes hold of your heart.

"I knew it would make me a better person. "

There's a powerful family feel to the home, says Heinen, that inspires a special loyalty among the volunteers who come to work in the kitchen, read aloud to residents and take them to chapel or to doctor appointments.

But what truly separates St. Joseph's home from a typical care facility, Heinen believes, is the devotion of the Little Sisters of the Poor to the residents in their care.

And the sisters are at their finest, she adds, when residents are living out their final days at the home – as did Heinen's grandmother, and the mother of Wanda Vizcaino, who volunteered countless hours organizing the family fest.

As residents near the end, says Heinen, the sisters pray and keep vigil round the clock, in a ritual that they call "accompanying them to heaven."

For relatives who witness the vigil, it's a moving experience – whether or not the resident or family isCatholic. Heinen treasures the words of one late resident's son, who told her he "truly believes the Little Sisters prayed his mother to heaven."

But Sister Loretto insists that it's the other way around.

"We give our lives," she says in her rich Irish brogue. "But we get 100 percent back from [the residents]. We're so enriched by them.

"They'll pull us into heaven."

The Little Saint of the Poor, a play written to commemorate the canonization of St. Jeanne Jugan and present the story of her life and her struggles, will be held at Hermitage High School November 20 at 7 p.m. Produced and performed by Theater of the Word, the play is suitable for older children and adults and is free and open to the public. However, seating is limited, and audience members are asked to call 288-6245 or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) to reserve a seat. Donations will be accepted to help cover expenses of bringing the touring show to town.

For information about volunteering, making a donation, or applying to live at St. Joseph's Home, call 288-6245 or visit http://littlesistersofthepoor.org.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

A safer way across


A project years in the making is beginning to make life easier for wheelchair-bound residents in Northern Henrico.

The Virginia Department of Transportation is completing a $2-million set of enhancements to the Brook Road corridor in front of St. Joseph's Villa and the Hollybrook Apartments, a community that is home to dozens of disabled residents. > Read more.

New conservation easement creates wooded buffer for Bryan Park

Five years ago, members of the Friends of Bryan Park were facing the apparently inevitable development of the Shirley subdivision in Henrico, adjacent to the forested section of the park near the Nature Center and Environmental Education Area.

As part of the Shirley subdivision, the land had been divided into 14 lots in 1924, but had remained mostly undisturbed through the decades. In 2012, however, developers proposed building 40 modular houses on roughly 6.5 acres, clear-cutting the forest there and creating a highly dense neighborhood tucked into a dead end. > Read more.

Meet the men running for governor


Virginia will elect a new governor this year.

The governor’s position is one of great power and influence, as the current officeholder, Terry McAuliffe, has demonstrated by breaking the record for most vetoes in Virginia history.

However, during the last gubernatorial race in 2014, the voter turnout was less than 42 percent, compared with 72 percent during last year’s presidential election. > Read more.

RISC to address reading, childhood trauma, job training at assembly

On May 1, more than 1,700 community members representing Richmonders Involved to Strengthen our Communities will gather at St. Paul’s Baptist Church (4247 Creighton Road) at 7 p.m. to address elementary reading, childhood trauma and job training in the greater Richmond region. Community members will speak about each issue and proposed solution.

For three years, the organization has sought implementation of a specific literacy program in Henrico County that it believes would help children who struggle with reading. > Read more.

Henrico to begin update of zoning, subdivision ordinances April 26


Henrico County is beginning a comprehensive update of its zoning and subdivision ordinances — the first such effort in six decades — and will introduce the project as part of the April 26 meeting of the Henrico County Planning Commission.

The meeting will begin at 9 a.m. in the Board Room of the Henrico Government Center, 4301 E. Parham Road. The ordinance update project will be featured as the final item on the agenda. Project consultant Clarion Associates will give a presentation, and meeting participants will be able to ask questions and provide comments. > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


For our Top 10 calendar events this weekend, click here! > Read more.

 

April 2017
S M T W T F S
·
·
·
·
·
·
17
·
·
·
·
·
·

Calendar page

Classifieds

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

Battles and Leaders, a military book discussion group, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Fairfield Library. Enjoy an evening of lively discussion focused on the battles, leaders and wars that have shaped world history. The title for April is “Gates of Fire” by Steven Pressfield. For details, call 501-1930 or visit http://www.henricolibrary.org. Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers

The Plate