A new look for Innsbrook?

Above, left, the Innsbrook site on which Highwoods Properties plans to build a mixed-use development, as it looks today. At right is the proposed redevelopment. (Courtesy Highwoods Properties)




A new era for the Innsbrook corporate center could begin officially this week, pending approval from Henrico County’s Board of Supervisors.

The board will hear a request Dec. 11 by Highwoods Properties to redevelop a 39.46-acre section of the 630-acre corporate center as an urban mixed-use tract, allowing for as much as 2.3 million square feet of commercial and residential development – including 1,230 residential units. The Planning Commission recommended the plan for approval at its Nov. 8 meeting.

Supervisors rezoned most of the site – 36 acres – to the then-new urban mixed use classification as part of a larger case in 2005 that sought to breathe new life into the Far West End community by allowing a variety of uses in close proximity to each other, similar to the communities of West Broad Village and Rocketts Landing. Highwoods’ current proposal would establish conditions on the entire 39.46-acre site, which is located generally between Cox Road, Sadler Road and Nuckols Road.

During a work session last month, the board heard its first formal presentation about the proposal for the project.

Planning Director Joe Emerson told supervisors that his staff generally supports the plan but objects to a proposed Highwoods proffer that would require the county to pay for right-of-way acquisition and permits related to road improvements for the project. (Highwoods must construct an additional eastbound lane on Nuckols Road between Sadler and Cox roads and an additional westbound lane on Nuckols from Lake Brook Drive to the I-295 northbound ramp as part of the project.)

“We don’t feel we should be obligated to absorb the cost of those items,” Emerson said.

Some neighbors of the site have expressed concerns about traffic, which already is snarled along Nuckols Road during morning and evening commutes, and the proposed height of some buildings, the tallest of which would be 250 feet, or about 16 stories.

But Emerson said that Highwoods’ proposal – which would limit buildings within 150 feet of existing residential development to 45 feet in height and those between 150 feet and 300 feet of such development to 80 feet in height – was consistent with recommendations of his department’s 2010 Innsbrook Area Study. That study set guidelines for a variety of future urban mixed use projects in the community, in order to establish consistency in building heights, landscaping, streetscaping, parking, signage and a variety of other features.

Still, “there is no doubt that you’re going to be able to see the tall buildings,” Emerson said.

Board Chairman Dick Glover (Brookland District) and Supervisor Pat O’Bannon (Tuckahoe District) both expressed some concerns about a proposed one-lane roundabout that would be constructed at the intersection of Sadler Road and Sadler Place, about 600 feet south of Nuckols Road.

“Drivers around here, I don’t think they’re used to this, and it bothers me a lot. . . that this is more an impediment,” O’Bannon said.

But Deputy County Manager Tim Foster told the board that the roundabout – which might cost about $200,000 and could be the first public roundabout built in the county – would be safer than a traffic signal, which would cost between $150,000 and $250,000. Traffic at the intersection wouldn’t yet warrant a signal, and locating an additional signal so close to Nuckols Road could create traffic flow challenges, he said – whereas a roundabout would be more effective in keeping vehicles moving.

Foster noted that roundabouts are different from traffic circles; the latter typically are larger, involve more lanes and more merging traffic and may present more opportunities for confusion or traffic accidents.

Roundabouts, he said, are smaller, typically involve just one lane of traffic and are used in less-congested areas to keep traffic flowing better than it would otherwise. On the rare occasions when accidents do occur at roundabouts, they’re usually less severe because vehicles are traveling at a lower rate of speed than they would be otherwise, he said.

Glover conceded that he would support the plan if it were deemed the safest option.

Some residents have expressed concerns that construction of the roundabout would eliminate direct access from Sadler Road to Nuckols Road, but Emerson said that wasn’t entirely accurate. The new roundabout would shift Sadler south into its old roadbed but still theoretically provide drivers the chance to connect to Nuckols without stopping.

Responding to residents’ concerns that more development would worsen traffic, Emerson agreed that the initial impact could boost traffic numbers. But he said that the ultimate outcome of urban mixed use development often is a reduction in traffic, because some residents also work and/or shop within the same community.

“The UMU district is intended to provide flexibility not otherwise available in the zoning ordinance to achieve a unique destination, conveying a “sense of place,” and providing a desirable destination to live, work, and recreate,” planners wrote in a report about the proposal.

Emerson told the board that as the project takes shape and residents move in, some benefits would become noticeable.

“You’ll have people coming and going over the whole day – not just at two peak times,” he said.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

HCPS wins national honor for overhaul of Code of Student Conduct, supports


Henrico County Public Schools recently was recognized by the National School Boards Association for a sweeping overhaul of the school division’s approach to student supports. HCPS was one of five large U.S. school systems recognized with a first-place honor in the 2017 Magna Awards, presented Saturday in Denver at the organization’s annual conference. The awards recognize school divisions and leaders “for taking bold and innovative steps to improve the lives of students and their communities,” according to the group.

The award recognizes Henrico Schools’ efforts of the past several years, from re-examining its policies to implementing more support systems. After a two-year conversation with the community through public hearings and other feedback, HCPS adopted a revised Code of Student Conduct for the 2015-16 school year. > Read more.

Environmentalists say budget hurts efforts to protect bay

Environmental groups are outraged at the Trump administration’s proposed funding cuts for Chesapeake Bay cleanup programs.

President Donald Trump’s budget plan, released last week, reduces the budget for the federal Environmental Protection Agency by 31 percent. That includes a $427 million in funding to address regional pollution, such as the Chesapeake Bay protection efforts. The proposed budget would eliminate funding for the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program, which received $73 million from the federal government in 2016. > Read more.

Glen Allen ES principal receives REB Award


Melissa Halquist-Pruden, principal of Henrico County’s Glen Allen Elementary School, earned the 2016-17 REB Award for Distinguished Educational Leadership. The Community Foundation presents the award to four principals annually – one each from the school systems of Henrico, Chesterfield and Hanover counties and one from the city of Richmond schools.

The award recognizes principals who go beyond the day-to-day demands of their jobs to create an exceptional educational environment. The award stresses management and communication skills, and the ability to inspire, encourage and advocate for the school. > Read more.

Grant to help Hermitage H.S. upgrade CTE program equipment


Governor Terry McAuliffe announced recently that Henrico County’s Hermitage H.S. will be among 16 high schools and technical centers statewide to receive a grant to upgrade equipment for career and technical education (CTE) programs.

The program gives priority to challenged schools, Governor's STEM Academies and Governor's Health Science Academies. Each school or center will receive $37,500 to purchase new equipment and make other necessary improvements. At Hermitage, the funds will be used for precision machining equipment. > Read more.

Virginia raises a toast to George Washington’s whiskey


George Washington is recognized as the father of our country, but with a bill signed into law by Gov. Terry McAuliffe, Washington also will be recognized under another title – distiller of Virginia’s official liquor.

SB 1261, sponsored by Sen. Adam Ebbin of Alexandria, adds a “state spirit” to the list of the commonwealth’s official emblems and designations and crowns George Washington’s rye whiskey with the title.

The bill, which McAuliffe signed last week, highlights George Washington’s contributions to the culture of Virginia as “a native son of Virginia born on February 22, 1732, in Pope’s Creek”; “the first American president, commander of the Continental Army, and president of the Constitutional Convention”; and “a model statesman ... universally acknowledged as the father of our nation.” > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


For our Top 10 calendar events this weekend, click here! > Read more.

 

March 2017
S M T W T F S
·
·
·
·

Calendar page

Classifieds

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

Henrico County Recreation and Parks’ Adventure Series concludes with “Journey on the James” from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Henrico County Administrative Board Room at 4301 E. Parham Rd. Take a seat as you experience a stand-up adventure travelling from Lynchburg to Richmond on a road of water, the James River. Standup paddle boarder Ben Moore will guide you through his adventure racing across the James, as well as a few other exciting adventures including snorkeling and waterfalls in both Norway and Costa Rica. For ages 12 and older. Admission is free. For details, call 652-1417 or visit http://www.henrico.us/rec. Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers

The Plate