In the garden


In fall, gardeners often start thinking about perennials either because they want to add additional plants to their gardens or because they need to take at least some of them out of their garden beds.

Perennials are plants that don’t die after one season but continue to live year after year. The category actually includes trees, shrubs, lawns, hardy bulbs, some vegetables and houseplants, and a large number of plants that are grown for their ornamental flowers or foliage. Many of these ornamentals are called “herbaceous perennials,” meaning the tops of the plants die in fall and come up again in spring.

Plants that live through the winter are “hardy.”

Many people plant perennials thinking they can save themselves a lot of work in the future. Plant them once, and they’ll continue to come up. But perennials are not maintenance-free. They typically require feeding, staking, and cutting back after they bloom. Periodically, many of them also need to be dug up and divided.

“Usually I wait until we’ve had a heavy frost to start putting my garden to bed,” says Henrico Master Gardener Erica Gilliam.

Gilliam says she cuts some plants in her garden back while leaving others. “”It’s nice to get your garden cleaned up and looking better,” says Gilliam, “But I leave some things up like the purple coneflowers because the birds eat them.”

Gilliam also divides some of her perennials in fall, but tends to wait until spring for most. “The plants are smaller in spring, so it’s easier,” she says.

Perennials should be divided when they are dormant, according to the Virginia Cooperative Extension publication “Perennials: Culture, Maintenance and Propagation,” either “just before a new season of growth, or in the fall so they can become established before the ground freezes.”

Gilliam often shares plants with friends. “I’ve always heard that if you divide your plants and give them away to your friends, you can always go back to them if you lose your original plant,” she says.

“My friends shared a lot of plants with me,” says Gilliam. “In the first years, I used to have teas in my garden so my friends could come over and see their babies growing here.”

Gilliam calls her garden a “colonial friendship cutting-garden,” partly because many of the plants were given to her by friends, and partly because friends helped inspire the design.

“When we first moved here and friends came to visit, we took them to colonial sites around the state,” says Gilliam, “and I got interested in the gardens.” She was particularly inspired by Monticello, and today her garden includes many plants that would have been found in Thomas Jefferson’s gardens interspersed with modern cultivars.

“Something is usually blooming in my garden from February to November,” says Gilliam. “I like to cut them and bring the color into the house.”

Though most perennials bloom for only a few weeks, combining plants that bloom at different times ensures continuous blooms.

Gilliam says some of the blooms in her garden also remind her of family members. “My peonies came from my mother,” she says. “And the evening primroses.”
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Earnhardt gives Redskins a ride


Dale Earnhardt Jr., driver of the Hendrick Motorsports No. 88, stopped at Richmond Raceway Aug. 8 in advance of the track’s NASCAR weekend in September. He was joined by five players from the Washington Redskins, who were in town for the team's training camp, which concluded Aug. 14. The day in Richmond gave Earnhardt and the Redskins players an opportunity to see how the athletes compete in their respective sports. > Read more.

READ Center a finalist for $25k grant


The READ Center is a top-200 cause finalist in State Farm’s Neighborhood Assist program, making it eligible to earn a $25,000 grant to support adult literacy in the Richmond region. The 40 organizations from across the nation with the most votes will win grants.

The READ Center, based in Henrico, provides classroom instruction and one-to-one tutoring to adults with very low literacy. > Read more.

Henrico County property transactions, Aug. 1-6


A sample of property transactions during this period appear below:

1847 New Market Road – $137,000, 1,659 SF (built in 1935), from Philip J. Whiteway, III and Donna H. Whiteway et. al to David T. and Katherine W. Benckert.
6304 Trailing Ridge Court – $165,000, 1,246 SF (built in 1999), from Carol A. Allen to Sandra R. Jefferson.
1722 Devers Road – $169,950, 816 SF (built in 1949), from Heather K. Brunner to Kasey A. Sheridan and Jason Talbot.
3201 Purvis Road – $175,000, 2,051 SF (built in 1997), from Geneva Moore LLC to Jessica I. Bolling. > Read more.

Glen Allen wins 2 of first 3 games at 14U Babe Ruth World Series


The host Glen Allen 14-year-old all-star baseball team won two of its first three games in pool play at the 14-year-old Babe Ruth World Series, which is it hosting at RF&P Stadium in Glen Allen. The team beat the Midwest Plains champions, 9-4, in its first game Aug. 10, then topped the Southwest champions, 7-3, Aug. 11 before dropping a 5-4 result to the Ohio Valley champions. > Read more.

Filipino Festival draws thousands


Thousands of attendees visited the annual Filipino Festival at Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Lakeside Aug. 11-12, enjoying native foods, entertainment, clothing and commemorative items and much more. > Read more.

Henrico Business Bulletin Board

August 2017
S M T W T F S
·
·
27
·
·

Calendar page

Classifieds

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

Country-rock troubadour Jonathan Edwards will perform at 8 p.m. at The Tin Pan, 8982 Quioccasin Rd. Edwards is best known for his 1971 hit “Sunshine (Go Away),” as well as "Honky Tonk Stardust Cowboy," "Sometimes," "Emma," and "One Day Closer." His latest album is titled “Tomorrow’s Child.” Tickets are $30 in advance and $35 at the door. Doors open at 6 p.m. For details, call 447-8189 or visit http://www.tinpanrva.com. Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers

The Plate