In the garden

Caring for perennials this winter

In fall, gardeners often start thinking about perennials either because they want to add additional plants to their gardens or because they need to take at least some of them out of their garden beds.

Perennials are plants that don’t die after one season but continue to live year after year. The category actually includes trees, shrubs, lawns, hardy bulbs, some vegetables and houseplants, and a large number of plants that are grown for their ornamental flowers or foliage. Many of these ornamentals are called “herbaceous perennials,” meaning the tops of the plants die in fall and come up again in spring.

Plants that live through the winter are “hardy.”

Many people plant perennials thinking they can save themselves a lot of work in the future. Plant them once, and they’ll continue to come up. But perennials are not maintenance-free. They typically require feeding, staking, and cutting back after they bloom. Periodically, many of them also need to be dug up and divided.

“Usually I wait until we’ve had a heavy frost to start putting my garden to bed,” says Henrico Master Gardener Erica Gilliam.

Gilliam says she cuts some plants in her garden back while leaving others. “”It’s nice to get your garden cleaned up and looking better,” says Gilliam, “But I leave some things up like the purple coneflowers because the birds eat them.”

Gilliam also divides some of her perennials in fall, but tends to wait until spring for most. “The plants are smaller in spring, so it’s easier,” she says.

Perennials should be divided when they are dormant, according to the Virginia Cooperative Extension publication “Perennials: Culture, Maintenance and Propagation,” either “just before a new season of growth, or in the fall so they can become established before the ground freezes.”

Gilliam often shares plants with friends. “I’ve always heard that if you divide your plants and give them away to your friends, you can always go back to them if you lose your original plant,” she says.

“My friends shared a lot of plants with me,” says Gilliam. “In the first years, I used to have teas in my garden so my friends could come over and see their babies growing here.”

Gilliam calls her garden a “colonial friendship cutting-garden,” partly because many of the plants were given to her by friends, and partly because friends helped inspire the design.

“When we first moved here and friends came to visit, we took them to colonial sites around the state,” says Gilliam, “and I got interested in the gardens.” She was particularly inspired by Monticello, and today her garden includes many plants that would have been found in Thomas Jefferson’s gardens interspersed with modern cultivars.

“Something is usually blooming in my garden from February to November,” says Gilliam. “I like to cut them and bring the color into the house.”

Though most perennials bloom for only a few weeks, combining plants that bloom at different times ensures continuous blooms.

Gilliam says some of the blooms in her garden also remind her of family members. “My peonies came from my mother,” she says. “And the evening primroses.”

Reynolds CC to host sculptor Paul DiPasquale

Reynolds Community College will host Richmond sculptor Paul DiPasquale Sept. 28 as he shares his presentation “Art Talk, Why Art Matters” from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Conference Center Gallery of the Workforce Development and Conference Center on the Parham Road Campus, located at 1651 E. Parham Road in Richmond. This event is free and open to the public. > Read more.

Free children’s clothing for those in need

The Children's Clothing Closet at Highland Springs United Methodist Church will be open Saturday, Aug. 27 and Tuesday, Aug. 30 to provide free new or nearly new children's clothing for families in need, prior to the start of the school year. The Clothing Closet will be open from 10 a.m. to noon both days. The church is located at 22 North Holly Avenue. > Read more.

Weekend Top 10

Beautiful fall weather is back this weekend! Don’t leave your favorite pooch at home – take the whole family to Canine Companions’ DogFest Walk ‘n Roll at West Broad Village or FETCH a Cure’s annual Mutt Strutt at Deep Run Park. Pets are also welcome at this weekend’s Central Virginia Celtic Festival and Highland Games. Halloween events taking place Sunday include the University of Richmond’s 18th annual Trick or Treat Street and Goblins and Gourds at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.


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The Henrico County office of Virginia Cooperative Extension is selling apples, peanuts, honey and cookbooks to benefit local 4-H youth programs. Orders are due by Oct. 26.

The sale features Virginia produce and six different cookbooks, each with more than 140 recipes. The items and prices are:

•Winesap or York apples, $20 per half-bushel, or 83 cents per pound;
•Raw peanuts, with recipes, $10 per 2-pound sack;
•Salted or unsalted cocktail peanuts, $15 per 2-pound sack;
•Honey, $10 per 1-pound jar; and
•Cookbooks, $8 apiece. The titles are “On the Grill,” “Kids in the Kitchen,” “Slow Cooker,” “Homemade Classics,” “Cookies & Bars” and “Quick Fix.” Each spiral-bound cookbook measures 5½ by 4¼ inches and includes a soft cover and 150 pages.

Order forms are available at, the Extension Office, any Henrico library or by calling (804) 501-5160. A check or money order payable to Henrico 4-H Fund must accompany each order.

Because supplies are limited, orders received after Wednesday, Oct. 26 will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Orders will be available for pickup from 3 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 10 and from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 11 at the loading dock of the Human Services Building, 8600 Dixon Powers Drive. Full text

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