Henrico schools ‘dot’ landscape in green

From left, Mary Greenlee and Chris Lundberg, Steward School teachers; Steward mentor Nina Zinn of Urban Backyard Edibles; Jonathan Gosney, Varina HS teacher; and Allison Powell, BCWH architect and Varina mentor.

Henrico schools took two of the five awards at the Second Annual Connect the Dots for Green Schools Awards Ceremony, hosted Nov. 10 by The Steward School. In addition to hosting the ceremony, Steward – winner of the second place Leadership Award – also provided a hard-hat tour of the Bryan Innovation Lab, a state-of-the-art instructional center slated for completion in the spring.

Sponsored by the James River Green Building Council (JRGBC), the Connect the Dots Green School Challenge encourages area schools to devise and implement creative, effective and low-cost sustainable practices for their schools and communities.

Schools team up with professional “green mentors,” who help the schools (the dots) connect to the resources in the local and national community as they promote community outreach and instill ideals of environmental stewardship in the students.

At the first Connect the Dots awards ceremony in 2011, for instance, Henrico’s Holman Middle School took the third place Leadership Award for its work on a water conservation project and a green curriculum for math and science classes, with assistance from mentor Carrie Webster of Moseley Architects.

Some 14 schools participated in the 2012 challenge, said Gwen Murray of JRGBC, with participants from Varina High School and The Steward School among those that earned special recognition awards for going “above and beyond” the basics.

Special recognition
Winner of the second-place Leadership Award, The Steward School (and mentor Nina Zinn of Urban Backyard Edibles) incorporated programs in composting into both the Lower School and Middle School curricula, holding poster contests for the younger students and composting workshops with the older. Older students learned what foods are needed to form good organic soil, and Upper School students built compost beds and analyzed organic material in the soil produced.

Varina H.S. took the third-place Leadership Award for devising a garden plan designed to help meet the needs of higher functioning students with autism and intellectual challenges.

The program includes plans for an edible classroom that will feature a bamboo fence, rainwater irrigation, nutritional education and a historical garden incorporating information about the area’s early Native Americans inhabitants. Mentors from BCWH Architects worked with Varina on projects and activities, including taking students on a field trip to Tricycle Gardens.

Among other participating schools that received special recognition at the ceremony were Bellevue Elementary School and the Patrick Henry School of Science and Arts in Richmond, and C.C.Wells Elementary School in Chesterfield County.

Bellevue E.S. won the first place Leadership Award for a project that converted an empty side yard into a learning space, and efforts in which parents, teachers and students worked together to build raised beds for gardening, install bh or bb and had rain barrel. working with teachers to implement in curriculum. Wells E.S. won the Community Outreach Award with help from members of the popular Ecology Club, which led efforts to hold a Beautification Day, plant bulbs and bushes, decorate trash cans for recycling, hold a recycling relay, and promote the creation of posters and eco-art made from recyclable objects.

Patrick Henry earned the Outstanding Sustainability Curriculum Award for establishing a gardening curriculum and activities that included a garden clean-up, planting bushes for a butterfly garden, and growing lettuce to be used to make fresh salads on selected school days.

Living classroom
Following the awards ceremony, Becky Lakin of sustainRVA described recent clean-up initiatives and events such as an EcoArt Exhibit, as well as plans for future programs that include a Farm-to-Restaurant Week. Lakin was followed by Steward Upper School science teacher Chris Lundberg, who capped off the ceremony by leading two dozen visitors through the Bryan Innovation Lab.

Plans for the Lab, said Lundberg, grew out of the desire to provide a “living classroom” -- a place for interdisciplinary, hands-on study that connects the built environment and the natural environment in a way that provides enhanced opportunities for students to explore and learn.

With current pushes toward sustainability, 21st-century schools, and the disciplines of science, technology, engineering and math, said Lundberg, the premise behind the Bryan Innovation Lab was, “Wouldn’t it be neat if there was a building on campus where we could put all that together?”

The building exterior and its surroundings will include a green wall with growing plants, a covered patio, outdoor picnic pavilion, and doors that facilitate an easy flow between indoors and outdoors. On an adjacent storage building, students will construct a green roof. “[Students] can be outdoors one moment,” said Lundberg, “and the next moment be inside getting on their iPads.”

In a wooded area outside the building, an educational playground is planned that will feature such objects as simple machines, and perhaps a “musical contraption” that Lundberg saw in a Dutch building, in which rainfall creates music as it makes its way to the ground through a series of tubes.

The Lab’s entryway will feature an electronic dashboard so that students can see “what the building has been doing,” said Lundberg, whether they are at home or school. Students will be able to track output from passive solar devices, monitor data from the unit’s geothermal wells, and analyze the amount of roof run-off collected in underground cisterns (providing recyclable graywater for the building’s commodes).

While the Lab will be what Lundberg calls “a very spartan building – mostly steel and concrete,” students will be able to take advantage of that spartan interior to learn.

“The floor,” said Lundberg, “is just a concrete surface that was ground down to exposed aggregate . . . because it’s interesting for kids to see what’s in the cement.” In addition, interior beams will be exposed to display their numbers, helping students to understand how the building was put together; and ductwork will be color-coded so that students can visually track the flow of air.

Flexible design
The building is designed with relatively few fixed objects and extreme flexibility in mind, with classroom walls built on wheels and the ability to reconfigure smaller rooms into one multi-purpose room. Students will sit on wheeled ottomans that they can easily move. “Everything rolls away . . . [it’s designed] to get away from the traditional classroom,” said Lundberg, noting that with any luck, the multi-purpose room will be the site of the 2013 Connect the Dots Awards Ceremony. Another advantage of the flexible design, he said, is that it leaves room for changing technology, as well as the acquisition of funds that could allow expansion of the building.

In considering various design options for the Lab, representatives of Steward not only visited local models such as the VCU Rice Center and the Children’s Museum of Richmond but also crisscrossed the country, visiting sites from Massachusetts to California. “We wanted to see what people are doing with space instructionally,” said Lundberg, adding that architects at 3North and RVA Construction also contributed valuable feedback. “It’s really been a collaboration,” said Lundberg, “not ‘Here’s the idea, we build it, and there it is.’”

And just as the community has served as a resource for Steward, Steward officials hope the building will serve as a resource for the community, providing space for meetings and forums and hosting student tour guides to explain how the building works.

But most of all, said Lundberg, “the building we want to build is an innovative place for kids to learn, a mish-mash of the natural environment and the built environment, where students can discover their talents.

“We hope it will be a place where students have fun while they learn in non-traditional ways.”
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Crime Stoppers’ Crime of the Week: April 24, 2017


Crime Stoppers needs your help to identify the suspects who participated in a home invasion and robbery in the City of Richmond.

At approximately 2:33 A.M. April 12, four or five men forced their way through a rear door and into an apartment in the 1100 block of West Grace Street.

According to police, the suspects – one with a long gun and all but one in ski masks – bound the occupants with duct tape and robbed them of several items, including cash, mobile phones and a computer. > Read more.

HCPS named a ‘Best Community for Music Education’ for 18th straight year


For the 18th year in a row, Henrico County Public Schools has been named one of the best communities in America for music education by the National Association of Music Merchants Foundation. The school division has earned the designation in each year the group has given the awards.

The designation is based on a detailed survey of a school division’s commitment to music instruction through funding, staffing of highly qualified teachers, commitment to standards and access to music instruction. The award recognizes the commitment of school administrators, community leaders, teachers and parents who believe in music education and work to ensure that music education accessible to all students.
> Read more.

A safer way across


A project years in the making is beginning to make life easier for wheelchair-bound residents in Northern Henrico.

The Virginia Department of Transportation is completing a $2-million set of enhancements to the Brook Road corridor in front of St. Joseph's Villa and the Hollybrook Apartments, a community that is home to dozens of disabled residents. > Read more.

New conservation easement creates wooded buffer for Bryan Park

Five years ago, members of the Friends of Bryan Park were facing the apparently inevitable development of the Shirley subdivision in Henrico, adjacent to the forested section of the park near the Nature Center and Environmental Education Area.

As part of the Shirley subdivision, the land had been divided into 14 lots in 1924, but had remained mostly undisturbed through the decades. In 2012, however, developers proposed building 40 modular houses on roughly 6.5 acres, clear-cutting the forest there and creating a highly dense neighborhood tucked into a dead end. > Read more.

Meet the men running for governor


Virginia will elect a new governor this year.

The governor’s position is one of great power and influence, as the current officeholder, Terry McAuliffe, has demonstrated by breaking the record for most vetoes in Virginia history.

However, during the last gubernatorial race in 2014, the voter turnout was less than 42 percent, compared with 72 percent during last year’s presidential election. > Read more.
Community

YMCA event will focus on teen mental health


The YMCA, in partnership with the Cameron K. Gallagher Foundation and PartnerMD, will host a free event May 2 to help parents learn how to deal with teen mental health issues. “When the Band-Aid Doesn’t Fix It: A Mom’s Perspective on Raising a Child Who Struggles” will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Shady Grove Family YMCA,11255 Nuckols Road. The event will focus on education, awareness, and understanding the issues facing teens today. > Read more.

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.
Entertainment

Restaurant Watch


Find out how your favorite dining establishments fared during their most recent inspections by the Virginia Department of Health. > Read more.

 

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The Bizarre Bazaar returns to the Richmond Raceway Complex Mar. 31 to Apr. 2. A Virginia tradition for 25 years, unique offerings include seasonal gifts and decorative accessories for the home and garden, gourmet food and cookbooks, fine linens, designer women's and children's clothing, toys, fine crafts and artwork, spring and summer perennials, furniture and jewelry. Hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mar. 31 and Apr. 1 and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Apr. 2. Admission is $7 for adults and $1.50 for children 2-12. For details, visit http://www.thebizarrebazaar.com. Full text

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