In the Garden


With the arrival of fall, days will soon be getting noticeably shorter and nighttime temperatures will begin to fall.

Now, as your trees begin responding to the changing conditions, you can take a number of proactive steps to care for them and help ensure they will be healthy and beautiful for years to come.

“It’s a good idea to think about the health of your trees in fall,” says certified arborist Jason Anderson, co-owner of Arborscapes LLC. Anderson conducts the training on trees for Master Gardeners in Henrico, Chesterfield, and Goochland/Powhatan.

He advises starting by taking a good, long look at your trees. Notice whether there are dead branches – which are much easier to identify while the leaves are still on the tree. Some dead branches are normal, but if more than roughly 10% -- the amount varies by tree type – is dead, you may want to consider talking to a certified arborist.

Look again when the leaves start to fall to make sure all your deciduous trees of the same species are dropping their leaves at roughly the same time. “If one is dropping its leaves earlier, it can be a sign that the tree is stressed,” says Anderson.

Checking trees of like species again next spring to see if they bud at roughly the same time can also help you tell if you have a tree that is stressed.

“An important thing to remember,” says Anderson, “particularly if you have a mature tree is that the tree may not show signs of distress for two or three years following the event that causes the stress.”

After looking up, look down to check the mulch around your trees.

“Mulching is one of the best things you can do for your trees,” says Anderson, “provided you do it properly.”

Mulch around trees should be no more than 2-3 inches deep and should never be piled up against tree bark at the base of the tree. Make the ring of mulch as large as you can up to the dripline or end of the branches of the tree.

Good mulch materials include aged sawdust, shredded pine bark, or wood chips.

“It’s important not to over mulch,” says Anderson. “And you need to remember that mulch goes over the roots, but not on the trunk of the tree.”

Mulch adds organic matter to the soil around the tree and helps keep soil temperatures warmer, allowing tree roots to continue to grow later into the fall. Once winter arrives, mulch helps reduce alternate freezing and thawing that heaves soil and can cause damage to young roots.

Mulching also reduces water loss and helps maintain uniform soil moisture around tree roots.

“Grass roots compete with tree roots for water,” says Anderson. “Mulching eliminates the competition.”

Fall and winter when trees are dormant are also ideal times to do any pruning that may be needed. “Structural and formative pruning on trees less than ten years old can help eliminate problems in the future,” explains Anderson. “And older trees may need deadwood removed to improve their structure and reduce liability during bad weather.”
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

County streamlining, expanding some GRTC routes in Henrico


Some of Henrico County’s busiest GRTC bus routes will expand to include weekend service and will be regularly scheduled in 30- or 60-minute intervals, a Henrico Department of Public Works official told the county's Board of Supervisors earlier this month.

“This is about optimizing routes,” County Manager John Vithoulkas said. > Read more.

AAA to host summer car care events Saturday


AAA Mid-Atlantic will host summer car care events this Saturday, July 29, including at one of its Henrico locations.

AAA surveys show that many motorists are unprepared for roadside emergencies, so the organization will offer free battery, tire pressure and car maintenance checks at the events, which will run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. > Read more.

Janet James, pastor


Tennessee native Pastor Janet James of Gayton Kirk Presbyterian grew up in a small town surrounded by mountains in Eastern Tennessee called Dayton.

She grew up worshiping Baptist, but that soon changed when she attended college and explored her religious options. James attended a worship and music conference in 1989 in Montreat, N.C., that made her question her career choices. She could not stop studying and reading more about God and decided to go to career counseling. > Read more.

New utility services number for metro area

Richmond city, Henrico, Chesterfield and Hanover county natural gas customers have a new number to call for their utility services.

The City of Richmond Department of Public Utilities has replaced its old number, (804) 646-7000 as well as 311, with it's new number, (804) 646-4646 for all calls relating to utilities. Utilities include natural gas, water, sewer, storm-water and electric street-lighting. > Read more.

Henrico County property transactions, July 10-16


A sample of property transactions during this period appear below:

3714 Pemberton Ave.- $105,000, 720 SF (built in 1957), from William F. Patton Jr. to Jessica Garcia.

510 Besler Ln.- $121,000, 964 SF (built in 1986), from Joseph and Coral P. Bolden to Taneen Marlow.

3502 Westcliffe Ave.- $140,000, 1,564 SF (built in 1947), from Benny H. Wilson Jr. to Benjamin A. Nyannor. > Read more.

Henrico Business Bulletin Board

July 2017
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Virginia Repertory Theatre will present a musical retelling of the beloved American story “The Little Engine That Could” July 7-30 at The Children’s Theatre at Willow Lawn. The classic family tale of determination and perseverance is reimagined through the heartwarming relationship between a young girl and her grandfather. The musical is 50 minutes long and is suggested for ages four and up. Tickets are $16. For a performance schedule and to purchase tickets, visit http://www.va-rep.org. Full text

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