School Board blasts Va. Dept. of Education

Henrico County School Board members blasted the Virginia Department of Education during a work session Aug. 16, calling the state's new Standards of Learning tests in math inappropriate and discouraging and suggesting that they could set the state back by forcing teachers to teach to the test.

Board members made their comments after hearing mostly positive news from school system officials about anticipated state accreditation numbers for Henrico schools.

Ninety-seven percent of the county's public schools (64 schools in total) are expected to earn full state accreditation when final results are released next month, according to preliminary data compiled by the school system.

The results would represent a slight improvement from the 95.5 percent of schools that earned full accreditation last year.

Elementary and middle schools earn accreditation by meeting minimum thresholds of student achievement in the state's Standards of Learning tests. In addition to meeting similar SOL standards, high schools also must meet minimum requirements in the new Graduation and Completion Index (GCI) rating system as well.

But while they were pleased with the anticipated results, School Board members voiced their displeasure with the new math SOL tests.

"Shame on the state Department of Education," Board Chair Diana Winston said, taking issue with the fact that many third-graders in Henrico spent as long as two or three hours taking a test that is supposed to last at most 45 minutes. "What are they testing is what I want to know. They have thrown educators in the state of Virginia back to square one again. I don't know what the state is coming to, because this is not good for children."

Board Vice Chair Beverly Cocke of the Brookland District said that at Moody Middle School, students who spent four hours on the math test were not the exception but the rule. One Hermitage student spent nine hours taking a high school SOL math test, she said.

"The pendulum's just gone too far in the other direction," Cocke said. "This is hurting our children."

Varina District board member John Montgomery said that the new standards would require teachers to spend more time teaching to the test and could impact their ability to mold student learners.

"We're going to rise to the occasion [as a school system]," he said, "but really the question is 'At what cost, and to what benefit?' I don't know how we got to this point, but it sure is discouraging."

Superintendent Patrick Russo told the board that the school system had submitted a Freedom of Information Act request to the state to receive specific data about the average length of time it took students to complete the math tests and that it was awaiting that information.

Schools are considered accredited if they meet or exceed each of the required benchmarks during the most recent school year or if their average results during the most recent three years do so. Preliminary data shows that 59 percent of the Henrico schools expected to earn accreditation this year will have done so by meeting those benchmarks during the 2011-12 school year. The other 38 percent of schools (25 in total) will earn accreditation based on their three-year averages.

All Henrico high schools are expected to meet the GCI rating, which awards 100 points for each student who graduates in four years, 75 points for each student who earns a GED, 70 points for each student who is still enrolled in school after four years and 25 points for each student who earns a certificate of completion. Schools must earn an average of 85 points per student or higher to meet the standard.

Two schools – Fairfield and Wilder middle schools – are expected to be accredited with warning because of low math SOL scores. It would be the second straight accreditation with warning for Wilder.

School system officials have identified 12 "at-risk" schools on which they will focus extra efforts in the coming year with the goal of improving results. Those schools are Donahoe, Fair Oaks, Johnson, Montrose and Sandston elementaries; Brookland, Elko, Fairfield, Rolfe and Wilder middle schools; and Highland Springs and Varina high schools.

Academic Achievement Teams (AATs) will meet regularly at each school to review student data, create and implement plans and review them to make changes as needed in order to impact student learning in a positive way, Assistant Superintendent for Secondary Education Eric Jones told the Henrico School Board during a work session Aug. 16.


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HCPS wins national honor for overhaul of Code of Student Conduct, supports


Henrico County Public Schools recently was recognized by the National School Boards Association for a sweeping overhaul of the school division’s approach to student supports. HCPS was one of five large U.S. school systems recognized with a first-place honor in the 2017 Magna Awards, presented Saturday in Denver at the organization’s annual conference. The awards recognize school divisions and leaders “for taking bold and innovative steps to improve the lives of students and their communities,” according to the group.

The award recognizes Henrico Schools’ efforts of the past several years, from re-examining its policies to implementing more support systems. After a two-year conversation with the community through public hearings and other feedback, HCPS adopted a revised Code of Student Conduct for the 2015-16 school year. > Read more.

Environmentalists say budget hurts efforts to protect bay

Environmental groups are outraged at the Trump administration’s proposed funding cuts for Chesapeake Bay cleanup programs.

President Donald Trump’s budget plan, released last week, reduces the budget for the federal Environmental Protection Agency by 31 percent. That includes a $427 million in funding to address regional pollution, such as the Chesapeake Bay protection efforts. The proposed budget would eliminate funding for the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program, which received $73 million from the federal government in 2016. > Read more.

Glen Allen ES principal receives REB Award


Melissa Halquist-Pruden, principal of Henrico County’s Glen Allen Elementary School, earned the 2016-17 REB Award for Distinguished Educational Leadership. The Community Foundation presents the award to four principals annually – one each from the school systems of Henrico, Chesterfield and Hanover counties and one from the city of Richmond schools.

The award recognizes principals who go beyond the day-to-day demands of their jobs to create an exceptional educational environment. The award stresses management and communication skills, and the ability to inspire, encourage and advocate for the school. > Read more.

Grant to help Hermitage H.S. upgrade CTE program equipment


Governor Terry McAuliffe announced recently that Henrico County’s Hermitage H.S. will be among 16 high schools and technical centers statewide to receive a grant to upgrade equipment for career and technical education (CTE) programs.

The program gives priority to challenged schools, Governor's STEM Academies and Governor's Health Science Academies. Each school or center will receive $37,500 to purchase new equipment and make other necessary improvements. At Hermitage, the funds will be used for precision machining equipment. > Read more.

Virginia raises a toast to George Washington’s whiskey


George Washington is recognized as the father of our country, but with a bill signed into law by Gov. Terry McAuliffe, Washington also will be recognized under another title – distiller of Virginia’s official liquor.

SB 1261, sponsored by Sen. Adam Ebbin of Alexandria, adds a “state spirit” to the list of the commonwealth’s official emblems and designations and crowns George Washington’s rye whiskey with the title.

The bill, which McAuliffe signed last week, highlights George Washington’s contributions to the culture of Virginia as “a native son of Virginia born on February 22, 1732, in Pope’s Creek”; “the first American president, commander of the Continental Army, and president of the Constitutional Convention”; and “a model statesman ... universally acknowledged as the father of our nation.” > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

Metro Diner to open second Henrico location


Metro Diner, a comfort food concept, will open its second Henrico location next month. The company is accepting job applications for its Libbie Place location at 5626 West Broad Street. The diner concept, known for its fried chicken and waffles, meatloaf, and shrimp and grits, will bring 100 new jobs to the region as it plans to open its doors in April.

The 3,500-square-foot diner located in the Libbie Place Shopping Center will seat more than 100 and serve classic comfort food staples with a twist, such as fried chicken and waffles topped with strawberry butter and a stuffed challah bread French toast with strawberry and blueberry compote. > Read more.

 

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The Spring Children’s Consignment Sale at St. Andrew’s United Methodist Church, 9801 Fort King Rd., will take place from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Half-price sale is 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Registration is open to all consignors at http://www.myconsignmentsale.com/saumc. Proceeds benefit the church’s Kidz Kupboard program, which provides weekend meals to local students who might otherwise go without. For details, email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Full text

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