In the garden


Harvesting vegetables out of your own garden is very satisfying. Vegetables you grow yourself just seem to taste better, and it’s particularly nice to know they also help reduce the grocery bill.

You can continue to enjoy home-grown vegetables until first frost or, in some cases, until several weeks after the first freeze if you begin putting a fall vegetable garden in now.

In Central Virginia, the first frost usually occurs around Oct. 15, so early August is the right time to begin planning and planting.

“We’ll start our seeds during the next couple of weeks,” says Henrico Master Gardener Robin Bryant, who’s planning a fall garden with residents at the home where she works as a counselor. “It will be time to take out our squash, and that frees up a big space for planting.”

Last year Bryant raised fall crops of lettuce, beets, collards, turnips and kale in her garden. “Some crops will even overwinter here,” she says. “Last year, I thought the kale was dead and started to pull it out, but my boyfriend suggested we leave it in, and it came back in the spring.”

Many vegetables can be grown in the fall, and the flavor of some, such as cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, spinach, Jerusalem artichokes, and Brussels sprouts may actually be improved after a frost.

If they’re mulched, kale, spinach, onions, lettuce, parsley, parsnips, carrots and salsify can be enjoyed throughout the winter.

Before planting fall crops, you may need to restore nutrients removed by spring and summer crops by adding compost or a light application of a complete chemical fertilizer to your soil.

Seeds need to be planted in moist soil so plant after a rain or water thoroughly the day before. The Virginia Extension Service recommends sprouting seeds indoors before planting for a fall garden. Sprouted seeds can be planted deeper than normal which helps prevent them from drying out.

Bryant hasn’t tried sprouting her seeds before planting, but she agrees that attentive watering is a must, especially after seedlings begin to appear. “You have to keep watering,” says Bryant. “Water, water, water, every day, sometimes even twice a day, or the little seedlings are not going to make it.”

Insects may not pose the same problems in fall vegetables because their peak activity is usually in mid-summer, but you’ll still need to check the plants periodically. Rotating crops so that those in the same family are not put back into the same space in the garden can also help prevent disease and pest problems.

“When I was a child gardening with my father, we only had a summer garden,” says Bryant. “But when I became a master gardener, I learned about fall gardens and started planting them.”

“We really enjoy our gardens,” she adds.

Fall gardens help optimize production from your gardening space, and they can be an opportunity to try again if something you planted in the spring didn’t grow. As Henrico Extension Agent Lisa Sanderson says, “Gardening is always a lovely learning experience.”
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New GRASP scholarships to aide winners with college debt and costs


Fifteen Henrico County Public Schools students recently received a “2+2” scholarship from the non-profit organization GRASP (GReat Aspirations Scholarship Program, Inc.). In total, the newly created scholarships will help 71 students receive their baccalaureate degrees from a Virginia college or university with lower costs and less student debt.

The scholarship awards each winner $1,000 for his or her first year at a community college to cover the costs not covered by financial aid, such as books and computers. > Read more.

Long & Foster’s Innsbrook, Short Pump offices participate in community service day event


Thousands of real estate agents and employees with Long & Foster Real Estate, including those at the Innsbrook and Short Pump offices in Glen Allen, Virginia, took part in the company’s 20th annual Community Service Day June 7.

The Innsbrook and Short Pump offices chose to volunteer with Housing Families First on June 7. The organization’s mission provides families experiencing homelessness with what they need to move to a stable housing situation. > Read more.

Network of Enterprising Women to award scholarships to local HS grads

Three recent Henrico County high school graduates are among the 10 local students who will receive scholarships from the Network of Enterprising Women during the organization's monthly luncheon July 6. > Read more.

Crime Stoppers’ Crime of the Week – June 26, 2017


Richmond detectives need the public’s help to identify the vehicle and suspects in the shooting incident of a 7-year-old boy and an adult male. Can you help Crime Stoppers solve this latest shooting?

The shooting occurred in the 1500 block of North 22nd Street in the Fairmount neighborhood of the city. Officers arrived and found the two victims near a bus stop. > Read more.

Richmond Montessori School earns VAIS reaccreditation


Richmond Montessori School, an independent Montessori school for children ages 2 to 14, recently earned reaccreditation from the Virginia Association of Independent Schools. The VAIS accreditation program is one of only a few recognized at the national level through the National Association of Independent School's Commission on Accreditation and is also recognized and approved by the Virginia Board of Education through the Virginia Council for Private Education. > Read more.

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June 2017
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Greater Richmond SCAN (Stop Child Abuse Now) will sponsor a screening of the documentary “Resilience: The Biology of Stress, and the Science of Hope” from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at St. Mary’s Hospital in Room 164. “Resilience,” the companion film to “Paper Tigers,” chronicles the birth of a new movement among pediatricians, therapists, educators and communities, who are using cutting-edge brain science to disrupt cycles of violence, addiction and disease. A short discussion will follow. Admission is free. To register, visit http://tinyurl.com/ResilienceScreening. Full text

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