Henrico County VA
facebook twitter email rss

Growing opportunities

Asian-American-owned businesses thriving

Minny South was born nearly 9,000 miles away from Henrico County, where she opened an optometrist office in 2008.

Her family moved from Laos to California when she was five years old. She attended college in California and optometry school in Florida before moving to Virginia.

South, whose given name is Khammany Southammavong, said she feels at home doing business in eastern Henrico.

“I love the people who come in here. I’ve found the clientele that I like,” she said.

The office in White Oak Village sees lots of foot traffic and the area offers a large pool of potential patients. That’s one reason South said she chose the location.

“I felt like the opportunity was great here. There are not a lot of doctors in the area.”

South launched her business just as the economy was taking a hit. Owning a business during a recession hasn’t been easy. In fact, South said getting started presented one of her biggest challenges.

“It is hard being a woman starting a business. I started this place without capital,” she said. “I couldn’t get a business loan because I had just gotten out of school. It was really hard getting a loan. So I bugged a lot of family members.”

After three and half years, South said she has learned a great deal about running a business and she’s learning more each year.

Even during the recession thousands of Asian-Americans ventured into business ownership in Virginia. Last month, the Virginia Asian Chamber of Commerce (VACC) celebrated entrepreneurship among Asians.

The chamber reports that Virginia had about 30,450 Asian-American owned firms in Virginia in 2002. Now there are more than 44,500. Hundreds are located in Henrico County.

Zain Afzal and his parents, Rizwan Afzal and Sadia Rizwan, owned a restaurant for about five years in Midlothian. In January 2012 they relocated to Short Pump, where the family lives.

“We always planned on moving the business to the West End,” they wrote in an e-mail. “We wanted to open a location in Short Pump because the area is booming especially for ethnic cuisine.”

Kabab Grille, their small restaurant in Towne Center West, specializes in Zabiha halal Punjabi/Pakistani cuisine.

Malik Khan of the Asian American Society of Central Virginia said he expects the number of Asian-American owned businesses in the county, especially restaurants, to continue growing as the population changes.

“The primary reason, I think, is because of the growing Asian-American population in Henrico County and these restaurants do provide a much needed service. More importantly they provide jobs,” Khan said.

Andy and Eunice Zhang have just started new jobs and created a few new jobs for others. The couple, originally from China, opened Red Nails 2 salon in Willow Lawn Shopping Center this month.
Eunice Zhang gives a pedicure while her
husband, Andy, talks with an employee
in the background at their Red Nails 2
salon in Willow Lawn.

On a recent Saturday morning, Andy Zhang put out trays of cookies and cupcakes for the salon’s grand opening while his wife gave a client a manicure.

The Zhangs are two of Henrico County’s newest entrepreneurs, after working for years at his family’s restaurants from Baltimore to Richmond.

Andy Zhang said his wife didn’t like the long working hours in restaurants so she trained to become a nail technician. After getting her certificate, she worked in salons.

“She had a dream. Her dream [was] to own a nail salon,” Andy Zhang said during an interview in one of the salon’s waxing rooms. “I’m her husband so I wanted to make her dream come true.”

The couple worked and saved money for about five years toward their dream.

Meanwhile, the owner of the original Red Nails (also in Willow Lawn) offered to help the Zhangs get started. Red Nails 2 opened once the shopping center expanded this spring.

Andy Zhang said getting everything ready for opening day was difficult. He described how they had to find all of the equipment and furniture and oversee building the salon from scratch.

“We spent a lot of time but it’s worth it. It’s worth it,” he said. Then he headed out of the side room to greet two new customers.
Community

Celebrating 106 years

Former Sandston resident Mildred Taylor celebrated her 106th birthday Aug. 9. Taylor, who now lives in Powhatan, is still a member of Sandston Baptist Church. She was visited the day after her birthday by several members of the church, who played for her a recording of the entire church membership singing happy birthday to her during worship. > Read more.

YMCA breaks ground for aquatic center

YMCA officials gathered last week to break ground on the new Tommy J. West Aquatic Center at the Shady Grove Family YMCA on Nuckols Road. The center, which will featured 7,600 square feet of competitive and recreational space, including water slides, play areas for children and warmer water for those with physical limitations, is the fourth phase of a $4 million expansion at the facility. West was president and CEO of Capital Interior Contractors and a founding member of the Central Virginia Region of the Virginia Chapter of Associated Builders and Contractors. > Read more.

Rotary donates to ‘Bright Beginnings’

The Sandston Rotary Club recently donated $1,000 to the Sandston YMCA for its Bright Beginnings program, which helps provide children in need with school supplies for the new school year. > Read more.

Page 1 of 116 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›

Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


Enjoy the final days of summer with comedian Guy Torry, the Sam’s Club National BBQ Tour or mystery writer Mary Miley Theobald at Twin Hickory Library. Another great way to welcome the beginning of fall is to check out the UR Spider Football season opener with man’s best friend. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Bottoms up

Short Pump brewery offers more than just beer
I am still (happily) thinking about my entire experience at Rock Bottom Restaurant and Brewery last week. Knowing nothing about this new brewery out of Denver, I was leery of brew-pub in the heart of Short Pump Town Center – this is not what I’d usually think of as a perfect fit, and yet, it was.

The restaurant and craft brewery opened in early June and features 10 beers made by female brewmaster Becky Hammond (pictured). This is the restaurant’s second location in Virginia; the first is in Arlington. Behind glass walls, customers watched the beer brewing in massive steel barrels. For our up-and-coming beer region, it makes sense that Short Pump would jump on board.

As I walked up to the back of the mall near the comedy club, I was taken aback by what I saw: at the top of the stairs was an overflowing restaurant with outdoor seating, large umbrellas and dangling outdoor lights. > Read more.

Cultural Arts Center announces 2014 fall class schedule

The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen is now registering participants for its fall 2014 schedule of classes.

The center will offer more than 100 classes for children and adults, covering topicssuch as culinary arts, fiber arts, visual and performance arts and more. Instruction is structured to appeal to a wide range of abilities, from beginners to experts of all ages. Class sizes are kept small to ensure maximum benefit for participants with generally no more than 15 students. > Read more.

Page 1 of 94 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›







 

Reader Survey | Advertising | Email updates

Classifieds

Sr. SAS Programmer Analyst w/MS degree & 1 yr. exp.: provide analytical support to perform data analysis, backend testing, adhoc reporting, custom./modify. to standard reports, dev. strategies to increase bus.… Full text

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

James River Cellars Winery, 11008 Washington Hwy. in Glen Allen, will host a Labor Day Wine & Cheese Pairing from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Celebrate the holiday with a… Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers