Henrico County VA

All in the family

Three generations of teachers thrive at Ward
Ward Elementary School’s family teaching triumverate (from left): Patt Kramer, Meghan Hyatt and Maripat Hyatt.
Varina’s Ward Elementary School is home to a unique trio of generational teachers who embody the art of teaching through a level of dedication that is representative of their relationship with each other, as well as their students.

Maripat Hyatt, the school’s art teacher since it opened, is at home in her art room, or “palace,” a brightly decorated and welcoming space, accentuated by tie-dye curtains, plants, students’ work and pictures. It is apparent that the room is special, just like her bond and connection with Ward Elementary, its students and faculty. The art room is centrally located in the school, allowing for the “hug brigade” to pass by as students come out of breakfast and share hugs with her, something she looks forward to every day.

“Every once in a while I wonder, ‘Do I ever want to do something else?’ No. Where do you get to go everyday where people love you, give you hugs and like what you teach them to do,” Hyatt says.

Just down the hallway, her mother, Patt Kramer, a special education instructional assistant at Ward, works with seven students in grades 2-5.

She joined the staff in 2003 after volunteering at Ward for a year and discovering that the special education program was going to expand. With a background in nursing, she felt that the children would need someone with her grandmotherly charm and a medically oriented background; and she was right.

Working at Ward opened up new doors for Kramer, who has been able to impact the lives of children, while also gaining a sense of community – something she had longed for her whole life, after moving excessively over the years.

A student returns
The teaching evolution continued when Maripat Hyatt’s daughter, Meghan (a JMU graduate) was unable to find a job and a substitute teaching position opened at Ward. Two years later, she accepted a full-time position in the special education department after falling in love with children and tuning into what her mother believes has always been her true calling.

For Meghan, returning to Ward was an easy transition. She attended Ward as a student the first year it opened and completed third, fourth and fifth grades there. As a teacher, she found herself back at a school at which her former principal was now her boss and her mother and grandmother could be found right down the hall.

Meghan Hyatt became fully involved in the special education program. Her desire to make an impact on the children is evident, along with a love for them that is clearly visible.

She began a program through which she matches the gifted class with her disabilities class during art so the students are able to receive social connection and awareness. Her hope is that the program will prepare them to appreciate the differences in people and provide them with a positive exposure to diversity that they will be able to carry with them in middle and high school.

Her hope is something that all three women possess. Each is dedicated to working with children and making a difference.

In a room with all three women present, there is a strong feeling of dedication, comfort and passion that can be felt. Their relationship sets an example for students and shows them how family can work together and accomplish common goals and purposes, which some of the students may not see at home.

“I think what’s tangible is the love felt here, and it’s as simple and as complicated as that,” Kramer says. “I’ve watched Maripat in multiple situations, and her patience and ability to discipline in a loving way or manage the classroom and get the kids to respond in a positive way is remarkable. They know they have a friend or someone to give a hug to or get a hug [from]. It’s a feeling that is permeable because she’s been here the whole time and it’s a unique experience.”

The uniqueness is evident to anyone who visits their classrooms. Principal David Burgess describes the situation as a natural evolution of teaching.

“When the three generations are at school it’s all about the kids. So the beneficiaries of the three are our kids – all our kids,” Burgess says.

Sharing family values
One of the most apparent characteristics of the generational teachers is the strong sense of community and family values that exists in their presence.

Visit the local grocery store and don’t be surprised to hear children yelling down the aisles, “Ms. Hyatt! Is that you Ms. Hyatt?” if they spot their teacher, who lives three miles down the road from Ward. She’s one of the four teachers that each student visits every week, creating a common thread and relationship that lasts from kindergarten through fifth grade.

“It’s really interesting when kids realize that’s my mother [Kramer] and that’s my daughter [Hyatt]. They have this sort of dumbfounded look on their face for a minute and want to know why her last name is different. It’s not common because a lot have single-parent families. What that does for the students is allow them to see how family can work together and have a common goal and purpose, which they may not see at home. That’s the biggest key.”

It’s an interesting experience for the three teachers, who act as flies on the walls for each other, watching as their family members transition and grow as teachers and as their students evolve as well.

All three women are very comfortable taking risks, working with people and – most importantly for them – putting the needs of the kids first.

“It tickles me,” Kramer says with a chuckle. “I think it’s fun and fascinating to watch my child grow to adulthood, and it’s not a usual experience parents have. There’s Meghan, who is my first grandchild, and Maripat, my first child. History repeats itself.

“I’m so proud of my children, but being here and being able to express and experience their world is amazing.”
Bail Bondsman Henrico VA Richmond VA
Community

Tree seedling giveaway planned April 2-3


The Henricopolis Soil & Water Conservation District will sponsor a tree seedling giveaway on April 2 at Dorey Park Shelter 1 from 2:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. and on April 3 at Hermitage High School parking lot from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Bare-root tree seedlings are available to Henrico County residents free of charge for the spring planting season.

The following seedling species will be available: apple, kousa dogwood, red maple, river birch, red osier dogwood, loblolly pine, sycamore, bald cypress, white dogwood and redbud. Quantities are limited and trees are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Each participant is allowed up to 10 trees total, not to include more than five of the same species. > Read more.

State provides online directory of Bingo games


Wondering where to go to play Bingo? Wonder no more.

The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) recently launched an online directory of permitted bingo games played in Virginia. Listed by locality, more than 400 regular games are available across the state. The directory will be updated monthly and can be found on VDACS’ website at http://www.vdacs.virginia.gov/gaming/index.shtml.

“Many Virginia charities, including volunteer rescue squads, booster clubs and programs to feed the homeless, use proceeds from charitable gaming as a tool to support their missions, said Michael Menefee, program manager for VDACS’ Office of Charitable and Regulatory Programs. > Read more.

Local couple wins wedding at Lewis Ginter


Richmonders Jim Morgan and Dan Stackhouse were married at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Lakeside Mar. 7 month after winning the Say I Do! With OutRVA wedding contest in February. The contest was open to LGBT couples in recognition of Virginia’s marriage equality law, which took effect last fall. The wedding included a package valued at $25,000.

Morgan and Stackhouse, who became engaged last fall on the day marriage equality became the law in Virginia, have been together for 16 years. They were selected from among 40 couples who registered for the contest. The winners were announced at the Say I Do! Dessert Soiree at the Renaissance in Richmond in February. > Read more.

Page 1 of 125 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›

Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


Two events this weekend benefit man’s best friend – a rabies clinic, sponsored by the Glendale Ruritan Club, and an American Red Cross Canine First Aid & CPR workshop at Alpha Dog Club. The fifth annual Shelby Rocks “Cancer is a Drag” Womanless Pageant will benefit the American Cancer Society and a spaghetti luncheon on Sunday will benefit the Eastern Henrico Ruritan Club. Twin Hickory Library will also host a used book sale this weekend with proceeds benefiting The Friends of the Twin Hickory Library. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

A taste of Japan

Ichiban offers rich Asian flavors, but portions lack

In a spot that could be easily overlooked is a surprising, and delicious, Japanese restaurant. In a tiny nook in the shops at the corner of Ridgefield Parkway and Pump Road sits a welcoming, warm and comfortable Asian restaurant called Ichiban, which means “the best.”

The restaurant, tucked between a couple others in the Gleneagles Shopping Center, was so quiet and dark that it was difficult to tell if it was open at 6:30 p.m. on a Monday. When I opened the door, I smiled when I looked inside. > Read more.

One beauty of a charmer

Disney’s no-frills, live-action ‘Cinderella’ delights

Cinderella is the latest from Disney’s new moviemaking battle plan: producing live-action adaptations of all their older classics. Which is a plan that’s had questionable results in the past.

Alice in Wonderland bloated with more Tim Burton goth-pop than the inside of a Hot Topic. Maleficent was a step in the right direction, but the movie couldn’t decide if Maleficent should be a hero or a villain (even if she should obviously be a villain) and muddled itself into mediocrity.

Cinderella is much better. Primarily, because it’s just Cinderella. No radical rebooting. No Tim Burton dreck. It’s the 1950 Disney masterpiece, transposed into live action and left almost entirely untouched. > Read more.

Page 1 of 122 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›







 

Reader Survey | Advertising | Email updates

Classifieds

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 888-617-1682
Full text

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

The Lunch and Life series of The Shepherd’s Center’s Open University will present Bernie Henderson, CEO of Woody Funeral Home, who will speak on “Commemorating D-Day at Normandy 70 Years… Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers