‘This road brought to you by…’

As the state budget inches closer to passage by the General Assembly, the Virginia Department of Transportation is hoping to raise money by selling the naming rights for roads, bridges and highway stretches.

“We look for revenue generation opportunity where we can, and we try to be creative with it,” VDOT spokeswoman Tamara Rollison said.

She said it has been a struggle for VDOT to maintain Virginia’s infrastructure in light of the department’s financial troubles.

“Our resources and revenues have been dwindling over the years,” she said, noting that a 1986 gas tax increase was the most recent serious increase in revenue. “When we can find innovative ways to partner with the private sector and generate some revenue, we try to do that.”

On March 10, the final day of the regular legislative session, the General Assembly passed two identical bills authorizing the Commonwealth Transportation Board, VDOT’s governing body, to sell the naming rights for such facilities as roads and ferries.

“The Board shall develop and approve guidelines governing the naming of highways, bridges, interchanges, and other transportation facilities by private entities and the applicable fees for such naming rights. Such fees shall be deposited in the Highway Maintenance and Operating Fund,” according to Senate Bill 639 and House Bill 1248.

The legislation, which is awaiting Gov. Bob McDonnell’s signature, says roads and facilities that already commemorate someone or carry a special name cannot be renamed “unless such naming incorporates the previous name.”

Moreover, “No name shall be eligible for the naming rights … if it in any way reasonably connotes anything that (i) is profane, obscene, or vulgar; (ii) is sexually explicit or graphic; (iii) is excretory related; (iv) is descriptive of intimate body parts or genitals; (v) is descriptive of illegal activities or substances; (vi) condones or encourages violence; or (vii) is socially, racially, or ethnically offensive or disparaging.”

Early projections of the prices and sales of road naming rights show that the program could raise a few million dollars per year and $273 million over the next 20 years. That’s a mere fraction of VDOT’s annual budget, which is $4.76 billion for fiscal year 2012.

Still, every little bit helps, officials say.

That’s especially true as the General Assembly holds a special session to craft a state budget for the next two years. The House and Senate have passed competing budgets, and a conference committee is trying to hammer out a compromise acceptable to both chambers.

The Senate version of the budget would delay the opening of tolls in Hampton Roads until 2014. This could cost the state an estimated $125 million. VDOT could offset some of the loss by selling the naming rights for roads.

Virginia already has developed a naming rights program for its highway rest stops, slated to begin later this year.

The central question is whether putting a name on a bridge or road will be attractive to consumers, especially to businesses seeking to expand their brand’s reach.

“I think the companies will love it,” said Bridget Camden, a professor of advertising at Virginia Commonwealth University. “Every time someone hits MapQuest, the name would come up.”

Camden, who spent 20 years in the advertising world working with companies such as IBM, BP and American Express, said companies initially might jump at the chance to brand a highway with their logo if the price is right. But certain factors could deter businesses from buying the naming rights.

“I think it could backfire on them if they can’t control the stretch of road,” Camden said. For instance, roads can have problems ranging from litter to prostitution – and those things could hurt a company’s image.

Camden said controlling the “brand message” and associations tied to a company is key for effective advertising.

“Every company wants their name associated with something positive, but what if that stretch of highway is accident prone?” she asked.

One possible solution is that companies not only buy the naming rights to the road or highway but also “adopt” the stretch and do some basic maintenance.

“Big corporations become very conscious about how they look, so maybe it will be incentive to keep the roads clean,” Camden said.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Rolls-Royce supplier lands in Henrico


A United Kingdom-based supplier for Rolls-Royce has established an office and manufacturing center at the Byrd Industrial Park in Eastern Henrico, the Greater Richmond Partnership announced July 18.

Erodex Ltd., a graphite products maker, recently signed a five-year agreement with Rolls-Royce to supply goods to the automotive company's Crosspointe campus in Prince George, Va. Erodex invested $2 million and hired four to quickly ramp up production for its client. > Read more.

New Walmart opens in Eastern Henrico


JULY 19, 7 A.M. – Eastern Henrico's first Walmart Supercenter opens to the public today at 5001 Nine Mile Road. The store, which occupies about 190,000 square feet and employs about 300 people, is located at the site of the former Fairfield Commons Mall, which is now known as Eastgate Town Center. > Read more.

Unattended oily rags cause fire in commercial building near Richmond Raceway


Unattended oily rags that spontaneously combusted caused an early morning two-alarm fire Tuesday in a commercial building in the 3800 block of Carolina Avenue, across from Richmond Raceway.

Henrico firefighters were called at about 5:10 to respond to reports of smoke coming from the building. Once they arrived five minutes later, they found thick smoke pushing from the rood on two sides of a warehouse whose tenant specializes in woodworking and hardwood floors. > Read more.

Crime Stoppers’ Crime of the Week: July 17-23, 2017


Crime Stoppers needs your help to solve a Hit & Run in the City of Richmond.

The crime occurred in the Carver neighborhood at the intersection of West Broad and Goshen Streets, around 6:45 p.m. on Sunday, May 7. Officers were told the victim was on his motorcycle and traveling westbound on West Broad Street. > Read more.

Henrico County property transactions, July 3-9


A sample of property transactions during this period appear below:

5304 Coxson Rd. – $126,500, 1,819 SF (built in 1953), from Madeline M. Weaver to Kyle and Aja O. Powers.

2451 Yarnell Rd. – $140,700, 1,196 SF (built in 1972), from Albert C. and Mary E. Nolan to Albert C. Nolan Jr.

909 Bowitch Ct. – $194,500, 1,824 SF (built in 2001), from Agnes H. Jones to Mark A. Dawkins. > Read more.

Henrico Business Bulletin Board

July 2017
S M T W T F S
·
·
·
·
·
·
3
5
·
·
·
·
·

Calendar page

Classifieds

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

The Fischer Sundae Puppets will present “Barn Yarns and Tall Tales” from 3:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. at Glen Allen Library. This delightful puppet program encourages children to sing-along and participate in movement activities, and features the stories “How Billy the Goat Saved Bessie the Cow" and "Little Engine #99.” For details, call 501-1950 or visit http://www.henricolibrary.org. Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers

The Plate