‘This road brought to you by…’

As the state budget inches closer to passage by the General Assembly, the Virginia Department of Transportation is hoping to raise money by selling the naming rights for roads, bridges and highway stretches.

“We look for revenue generation opportunity where we can, and we try to be creative with it,” VDOT spokeswoman Tamara Rollison said.

She said it has been a struggle for VDOT to maintain Virginia’s infrastructure in light of the department’s financial troubles.

“Our resources and revenues have been dwindling over the years,” she said, noting that a 1986 gas tax increase was the most recent serious increase in revenue. “When we can find innovative ways to partner with the private sector and generate some revenue, we try to do that.”

On March 10, the final day of the regular legislative session, the General Assembly passed two identical bills authorizing the Commonwealth Transportation Board, VDOT’s governing body, to sell the naming rights for such facilities as roads and ferries.

“The Board shall develop and approve guidelines governing the naming of highways, bridges, interchanges, and other transportation facilities by private entities and the applicable fees for such naming rights. Such fees shall be deposited in the Highway Maintenance and Operating Fund,” according to Senate Bill 639 and House Bill 1248.

The legislation, which is awaiting Gov. Bob McDonnell’s signature, says roads and facilities that already commemorate someone or carry a special name cannot be renamed “unless such naming incorporates the previous name.”

Moreover, “No name shall be eligible for the naming rights … if it in any way reasonably connotes anything that (i) is profane, obscene, or vulgar; (ii) is sexually explicit or graphic; (iii) is excretory related; (iv) is descriptive of intimate body parts or genitals; (v) is descriptive of illegal activities or substances; (vi) condones or encourages violence; or (vii) is socially, racially, or ethnically offensive or disparaging.”

Early projections of the prices and sales of road naming rights show that the program could raise a few million dollars per year and $273 million over the next 20 years. That’s a mere fraction of VDOT’s annual budget, which is $4.76 billion for fiscal year 2012.

Still, every little bit helps, officials say.

That’s especially true as the General Assembly holds a special session to craft a state budget for the next two years. The House and Senate have passed competing budgets, and a conference committee is trying to hammer out a compromise acceptable to both chambers.

The Senate version of the budget would delay the opening of tolls in Hampton Roads until 2014. This could cost the state an estimated $125 million. VDOT could offset some of the loss by selling the naming rights for roads.

Virginia already has developed a naming rights program for its highway rest stops, slated to begin later this year.

The central question is whether putting a name on a bridge or road will be attractive to consumers, especially to businesses seeking to expand their brand’s reach.

“I think the companies will love it,” said Bridget Camden, a professor of advertising at Virginia Commonwealth University. “Every time someone hits MapQuest, the name would come up.”

Camden, who spent 20 years in the advertising world working with companies such as IBM, BP and American Express, said companies initially might jump at the chance to brand a highway with their logo if the price is right. But certain factors could deter businesses from buying the naming rights.

“I think it could backfire on them if they can’t control the stretch of road,” Camden said. For instance, roads can have problems ranging from litter to prostitution – and those things could hurt a company’s image.

Camden said controlling the “brand message” and associations tied to a company is key for effective advertising.

“Every company wants their name associated with something positive, but what if that stretch of highway is accident prone?” she asked.

One possible solution is that companies not only buy the naming rights to the road or highway but also “adopt” the stretch and do some basic maintenance.

“Big corporations become very conscious about how they look, so maybe it will be incentive to keep the roads clean,” Camden said.
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Henrico Police arrest 2 Georgia men in connection with January murder


Henrico Police have arrested and charged two Georgia men with first-degree murder in connection with the Jan. 18 murder of 36-year-old Lamont Cornelius Baldwin in the 1200 block of Dominion Townes Terrace.

Antonio Tyrone Johnson (above, left) and Santonio Rodrigus Brown (above, right), both 24 and both of Atlanta, were charged. Johnson also was charged with use of a firearm in commission of a felony and possession of a firearm by a felon. > Read more.

Man struck and killed in western Henrico hit-and-run

A 24-year-old man died after being struck by a hit-and-run driver in western Henrico April 23.

The victim, Emmanuel Isaiah DeJesus, was found lying on the side of the roadway at about 10:25 p.m., April 23 near Patterson Avenue and Palace Way. He was transported to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead. > Read more.

Henrico woman earns national pharmacy fellowship


Henrico County native Nilofar “Nellie” Jafari recently was named the American College of Clinical Pharmacy-American Society of Health-System Pharmacists-Virginia Commonwealth University Congressional Healthcare Policy Fellow for 2017-18.

Jafari is a 2007 graduate of J.R. Tucker High School.

Pharmacists selected for the fellowship have the opportunity to gain real-world insight into health care policy analysis and development via immersion in the congressional environment. > Read more.

Section of Lauderdale Drive to be closed April 26 for drainage improvements


The westbound lanes of Lauderdale Drive will be closed between John Rolfe Parkway and Cambridge Drive on Wednesday, April 26 for drainage improvements.

The lanes are expected to be closed from approximately 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Motorists will be detoured from westbound Lauderdale onto John Rolfe, Gayton Road and Cambridge before being directed back onto Lauderdale. > Read more.

Henrico Police to host prescription drug take-back event April 29


The Henrico County Division of Police and the U. S. Drug Enforcement Administration will participate in the nationwide Prescription Drug Take Back Program Saturday, April 29. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Henrico County Training Center, 7701 East Parham Road, next to the Public Safety Building.

The program is free and anonymous. Unused or expired pills, patches and liquid prescriptions (in their sealed original container) will be accepted. Needles and sharp items will not be accepted. No questions will be asked. > Read more.
Community

YMCA event will focus on teen mental health


The YMCA, in partnership with the Cameron K. Gallagher Foundation and PartnerMD, will host a free event May 2 to help parents learn how to deal with teen mental health issues. “When the Band-Aid Doesn’t Fix It: A Mom’s Perspective on Raising a Child Who Struggles” will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Shady Grove Family YMCA,11255 Nuckols Road. The event will focus on education, awareness, and understanding the issues facing teens today. > Read more.

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.
Entertainment

Restaurant Watch


Find out how your favorite dining establishments fared during their most recent inspections by the Virginia Department of Health. > Read more.

 

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The Klemperer Trio will perform at 7:30 p.m. in Camp Concert Hall, Booker Hall of Music, at the University of Richmond’s Modlin Center for the Arts. The Klemperer Trio, formed in 1980, consists of Erika Klemperer, violin; Ronald Crutcher, violoncello; and Gordon Back, piano. They are a chamber ensemble with a repertoire spanning musical styles from classical to contemporary. Admission is free but tickets are required. To register, visit http://tinyurl.com/KlempererTrio. Full text

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