Back in Action

A Grace Place was swirling with activity Sept. 16, as volunteers scattered throughout the Henrico facility – some with books to read, others with paintbrushes in hand – to share their time, talents and smiles with others.

It was all part of the Greater Richmond and Petersburg United Way’s annual Day of Action, during which some 300 volunteers teamed to visit 20 organizations throughout the region and lend their assistance in the form of 900 volunteer hours. The event signaled the kickoff of the United Way’s annual fundraising drive which this year seeks to raise $17 million for the local chapter and the charities to which it contributes.

At A Grace Place, volunteers from Owens and Minor, Sun Trust and Dominion broke into several groups to help clients prepare for a fashion show the next day; host a jazz trivia event for others; paint an area in need of sprucing up; and lend their smiles and assistance to AGP’s clients and staff members.

“It’s a way for volunteers to get a firsthand look at what they can do for the United Way,” said Lynne Seward, CEO of A Grace Place.

A Grace Place, a non-profit organization founded in 1969, provides daytime health services, support and activities for adults who have a wide range of special needs – from those with mental handicaps such as dementia and autism to those with disabilities and senior citizens with chronic conditions. Its 229 clients come from all over the Metro Richmond region, their visits covered fully or partially by Medicaid in most cases and by scholarships in others. Its Board of Directors is composed entirely of volunteers.

The organization considers itself fortunate to have a strong group of corporate partners, including those who visited during last month’s Day of Action, as well as Genworth and Altria, Seward said. Local schools, including Collegiate, St. Christopher’s and VCU, also send students to research and volunteer at AGP.

“It’s great that corporations give time like this,” Seward said, gesturing toward a group of volunteers from Owens and Minor as they took a group photograph before setting off to mingle with clients. “They go back to work with renewed energy.”

The average client at A Grace Place receives services there for about a decade, Seward said. The organization usually has a handful of open spots, but Seward realizes that for each person it helps, countless others in the community are going without that same type of care. There simply aren’t enough options available to provide care for the growing number of people afflicted with various conditions, including Alzheimer’s, she said.

“We don’t know where [many of them] are getting care right now,” Seward said.    

A Grace Place is adding services so that it will be able to accept more adults with autism and Alzheimer’s. But, “the issue is funding,” she said. The United Way’s annual donations help – A Grace Place received more than $122,000 during its Fiscal Year 2008-09 – but funding from other sources continues to slide.

In one room last month, clients with dementia listened intently, smiles creeping across several of their faces, as a volunteer read a Dr. Seuss story. The room, decorated in soft tones and with children’s furniture, is designed to provide clients with a sense of their own childhood years.

Age Wave Planning
With United Way and Senior Connections, The Capital Area Agency on Aging, leading the way, a number of public and private organizations and businesses recently joined together to initiate the Greater Richmond Age Wave program, which seeks to prepare the region for the anticipated population boom among senior citizens. Projections show that the number of adults 65 and older in Virginia will double to 700,000 or 800,000 within 20 years, creating a broad range of needs – and opportunities.

“We’re already not meeting the needs of people today,” said Lea Setegn, spokeswoman for the United Way. “What are we going to do when it doubles?”

The project seeks to identify potential challenges associated with the growing senior population – such as the need for affiliated services and long-term care options – identify gaps in the system and make recommendations about how to fill them.

Perhaps most troubling to those like Seward who see the effects firsthand is that most families are uninformed about the options that exist for their family members.

“Families are totally caught off-guard,” she said. “People don’t plan – for retirement or for their own future fees.”

But A Grace Place also experiences the flip side of the growing population. It enjoys support from a number of volunteers who are themselves part of the Baby Boomers generation, Seward said.

“Baby boomers are changing everything that they touch,” she said. “We have boomers who come in and don’t only volunteer but invent new programs.”
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Varina meeting May 2 to address opioid crisis in Henrico


Varina District Supervisor Tyrone E. Nelson will hold a Community Conversations meeting Tuesday, May 2 to discuss the opioid epidemic in Henrico County.

The meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Henrico Theatre, 305 E. Nine Mile Road. Nelson will be joined by County Manager John A. Vithoulkas and members of the Henrico Heroin Task Force for a discussion of heroin and opioid abuse and ways to prevent it. > Read more.

Baker ES to remain closed until fall


Baker Elementary School students will complete the 2016-17 school year at other locations and will return to a restored building in fall 2017, school leaders have decided.

The decision was made in order to provide ample time for repairs to be completed at the fire-damaged school and to avoid additional interruptions to instructional time. > Read more.

Henrico Police arrest 2 Georgia men in connection with January murder


Henrico Police have arrested and charged two Georgia men with first-degree murder in connection with the Jan. 18 murder of 36-year-old Lamont Cornelius Baldwin in the 1200 block of Dominion Townes Terrace.

Antonio Tyrone Johnson (above, left) and Santonio Rodrigus Brown (above, right), both 24 and both of Atlanta, were charged. Johnson also was charged with use of a firearm in commission of a felony and possession of a firearm by a felon. > Read more.

Man struck and killed in western Henrico hit-and-run

A 24-year-old man died after being struck by a hit-and-run driver in western Henrico April 23.

The victim, Emmanuel Isaiah DeJesus, was found lying on the side of the roadway at about 10:25 p.m., April 23 near Patterson Avenue and Palace Way. He was transported to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead. > Read more.

Henrico woman earns national pharmacy fellowship


Henrico County native Nilofar “Nellie” Jafari recently was named the American College of Clinical Pharmacy-American Society of Health-System Pharmacists-Virginia Commonwealth University Congressional Healthcare Policy Fellow for 2017-18.

Jafari is a 2007 graduate of J.R. Tucker High School.

Pharmacists selected for the fellowship have the opportunity to gain real-world insight into health care policy analysis and development via immersion in the congressional environment. > Read more.

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April 2017
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The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen will present the Rock & Roll Jubilee at 7 p.m. March 31 and April 1 and at 2:30 p.m. April 2. Flashback to 1958 and be a part of the studio audience for the live broadcast on (fictitious) WJKS radio as it channels the spirits of the founding fathers of rock n’ roll. RVA favorites Craig Evans, Brad Tucker, Brian Sulser, George Garrett, Jim Wark, and BJ Kocen will perform all your favorite songs from the Titans of Teen Town. The Jubilee also includes 1950s’ period advertisements, skits and surprises. Tickets are $28. Enjoy dinner from DeFazio’s Catering before the 7 p.m. shows for $23. For details, call 261-ARTS or visit http://www.artsglenallen.com. Full text

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