Show Depicts Local ‘Strictest Parents’

For many parents, even one teenager in the home is plenty. And Mike and Pam Brown have a pair of them: Deep Run High School students Mary-Kaitlyn and Troy.

"Life is always full of commotion at my home," says Pam. "We are the type of family that would rather have all of our kids' friends hanging out at our home. So as you can imagine, it's a lot like Grand Central."

But for a week last winter, "Grand Central" wasn't sufficiently chaotic for the Browns, and they welcomed two teenagers from Kentucky and California into their home.

Not just any teenagers, either. These two were unruly, defiant, disrespectful – and not at all crazy about house rules at the Browns.'

At the same time, the Browns welcomed a film crew into their home who miked all four of them, set up lights throughout the house, and recorded the visit from every angle.

First, however, the entire family had to clear a series of hurdles that included extensive background checks and a four-hour psychological evaluation.
The idea, actually, was Mary-Kaitlyn's.

"A while back," recalls Pam, "Mary-Kaitlyn asked Mike and I if we would want to be a host family on this show called 'World's Strictest Parents.' We, of course, watched a few episodes to see what it would would entail."

The Browns were intrigued by the show, which airs on CMT and MTV.

"We prayed about it," says Pam. "We looked at this as an opportunity to make an impact – to open [the visiting teens'] eyes to what a functional family looks like. We couldn't wait to see how God would use our family to in some way reach out to these teens."

After a two-month process in which producers flew into town on weekends to get to know the family, the Browns were approved.

"Our friends, family and neighbors couldn't believe it when we told them that we would be on the show 'World's Strictest Parents,'" says Pam.

"The response we got from most of them was, 'But you're not that strict.'"

‘Alleluia Moment’
As the cameras rolled, 16-year-old Shauna and 17-year-old Megan arrived in Henrico Feb. 2, to greetings from the Brown family and the presentation of "reflection journals" from Pam.

The video depicts numerous eye rolls, smirks and stony stares as they meet the family and are invited to record their thoughts in the journals. On film, Shaun calls the reflection book "stupid," and begins to fill hers with nasty remarks.

On Day Two, after sleeping in and missing breakfast, Shauna and Megan are plunged into a day of chores – starting with shoveling snow from a sidewalk. Before long, Pam begins adding five minutes of shoveling every time the teens refuse to make eye contact or say 'yes, ma'am.'

"It's ridiculous," says Megan. "But I did what they said because I wanted to go inside. I was cold." Megan also begins writing in her journal, and eventually admits that it helps her to overcome her anger and boredom.

Shauna is more defiant, but eventually gives in and responds to Pam with a "yes, ma'm."

"That," says Pam, "was an 'alleluia' moment!"

On another day, Mike and Troy take the girls to a martial arts studio to participate in Troy's jiu-jitsu class.

"We felt that would be a great thing for the girls to do, as it focuses on being respectful, displaying a positive attitude, and self-discipline," says Pam. "It was also something that Mike could do with the two of them, as neither of the girls had a close relationship with their dad or stepdad."

On Day Three, the girls help make sandwiches for residents of Freedom House, which the Brown family has visited regularly for the past four years. On the visit to the homeless shelter, Shauna and Megan are ill at ease – until residents open up and begin talking about choices they made in their youth, and the consequences of those choices.

"Words are kinda weak sometimes," Mike points out, noting that the girls' encounters with residents had an impact no lecture about attitude could have made.

"I'm glad they took me," admits Megan. "Seeing people who don't have anything helped me think. . . about making sound decisions. They have no house, no job, no family. I don't want to be like that."

"I felt so bad for them, and how they lived," agrees Shauna.

The next day, Megan writes letters to two of the Freedom House residents, and both girls receive letters from their parents. Megan, whose father has never written to her before, discusses her letter with Mike. Shauna becomes emotional while discussing the letter from her mother with Pam, and reveals that she has felt cut off from her mom since her stepdad came into her life.

The week comes to a close with a snowball battle with the Browns and reflections from the girls about their week in Virginia.

"On the first day, I didn't think we could ever do this," Megan says of the snowball fight. She tells the Browns, "This week made me realize that I have a good parent. You guys taught me to respect people more."

"My mom will be shocked about the rules," says Shauna.

"And even more shocked that I followed some of them!"

When reunited with her mother and stepdad, Shauna breaks down in tears as she admits her feelings about her stepfather, and vows to improve her attitude.

Challenges and Rewards
"It was truly a challenging yet rewarding week," says Pam Brown, noting that the film crew came away with 50 hours of footage. That was condensed into a one-hour show, which aired early this summer and can still be viewed online.

"The crew was awesome," Pam adds. "They wrapped it up on Super Bowl Sunday – just down to the wire of kick-off time, with our team the Indianapolis Colts playing. It was so nice to have the cameras, mikes, and lights gone and just to wind down with our family of four once again.”

Although they are now back into their routines of work and school (Pam is assistant director of her family's Jack and Jill School, and Mike works as an investigator with the Hanover County Sheriff's Department), the Browns still hear from Shauna and Megan.

"Both girls Facebook me all of the time, checking in on several of the residents that they bonded with at the shelter," says Pam, noting that the visit to Freedom House had an impact on the residents as well as the girls. "It meant so much for the residents to know that they are making a difference, just by sharing their life stories.

"Every time we go, we are blessed beyond words by the great residents," she adds. "They come from all walks of life and have such stories to share. That is why we knew we wanted to involve Megan and Shauna in the experience."

Seeing others who were less fortunate went a long way toward changing the girls' attitudes, she believes.

"We are raising our kids to be 'others focused.' Life is an amazing gift, and how awesome it is to give of yourself to help and support those in need," says Pam.

She also believes that the chores and household rules had something to do with bringing the girls around. "Kids crave boundaries, love and attention," she maintains. "They won't tell you they do -- but they do."

Pam concludes by quoting one of her favorite Bible verses from Proverbs: “Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it.”

"It truly sums up our style of parenting," she says.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

‘Hello Kitty Truck’ rolls into Short Pump Saturday


MAR. 23, 12 P.M. – Hello Kitty fans, rejoice. On Saturday, the Hello Kitty Cafe Truck, described as “a mobile vehicle of cuteness,” will make its first visit to the region.

The truck will be at Short Pump Town Center, 11800 W. Broad St., from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. The vehicle will be near the mall’s main entrance by Crate & Barrel and Pottery Barn.

The Hello Kitty Cafe Truck has been traveling nationwide since its debut at the 2014 Hello Kitty Con, a convention for fans of the iconic character produced by the Japanese company Sanrio. > Read more.

Governor vetoes Republicans’ ‘educational choice’ legislation


Gov. Terry McAuliffe on Thursday vetoed several bills that Republicans say would have increased school choice but McAuliffe said would have undermined public schools.

Two bills, House Bill 1400 and Senate Bill 1240, would have established the Board of Virginia Virtual School as an agency in the executive branch of state government to oversee online education in kindergarten through high school. Currently, online courses fall under the Virginia Board of Education. > Read more.

School supply drive, emergency fund to help Baker E.S. students and faculty


Individuals and organizations wanting to help George F. Baker Elementary School students and staff recover from a March 19 fire at the school now have two ways to help: make a monetary donation or donate items of school supplies.

The weekend fire caused significant smoke-and-water damage to classroom supplies and student materials at the school at 6651 Willson Road in Eastern Henrico.

For tax-deductible monetary donations, the Henrico Education Foundation has created the Baker Elementary School Emergency School Supply Fund. > Read more.

Nominations open for 2017 IMPACT Award


ChamberRVA is seeking nominees for the annual IMPACT Award, which honors the ways in which businesses are making an impact in the RVA Region economy and community and on their employees.

Nominees must be a for-profit, privately-held business located within ChamberRVA's regional footprint: the counties of Charles City, Chesterfield, Goochland, Hanover, Henrico, New Kent and Powhatan; the City of Richmond; and the Town of Ashland. > Read more.

Business in brief


Cushman & Wakefield | Thalhimer announces the sale of the former Friendly’s restaurant property located at 5220 Brook Road in Henrico County. Brook Road V, LLC purchased the 3,521-square-foot former restaurant property situated on 0.92 acres from O Ice, LLC for $775,000 as an investment. Bruce Bigger of Cushman & Wakefield | Thalhimer handled the sale negotiations on behalf of the seller. > Read more.
Community

Villa’s Flagler Housing wins national NAEH award


St. Joseph's Villa’s Flagler Housing & Homeless Services was one of three entities to earn the National Alliance to End Homelessness' Champion of Change Award. The awards were presented Nov. 17 during a ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

NAEH annually recognizes proven programs and significant achievements in ending child and family homelessness.

Flagler completed its transition from an on-campus shelter to the community-based model of rapid rehousing in 2013, and it was one of the nation's first rapid re-housing service providers to be certified by NAEH. > Read more.

RIR’s Christmas tree lighting rescheduled for Dec. 12


Richmond International Raceway's 13th annual Community Christmas tree lighting has been rescheduled from Dec. 6 to Monday, Dec. 12, at 6:30 p.m., due to inclement weather expected on the original date.

Entertainment Dec. 12 will be provided by the Laburnum Elementary School choir and the Henrico High School Mighty Marching Warriors band. Tree decorations crafted by students from Laburnum Elementary School and L. Douglas Wilder Middle School will be on display. Hot chocolate and cookies will be supplied by the Henrico High School football boosters. > Read more.
Entertainment

CAT Theatre to present ‘When There’s A Will’


CAT Theatre and When There’s A Will director Ann Davis recently announced the cast for the dark comedy which will be performed May 26 through June 3.

The play centers around a family gathering commanded by the matriarch, Dolores, to address their unhappiness with Grandmother’s hold on the clan’s inheritance and her unreasonable demands on her family.

Pat Walker will play the part of Dolores Whitmore, with Graham and Florine Whitmore played by Brent Deekens and Brandy Samberg, respectively. > Read more.

 

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Lakeside Farmers’ Market, 6106 Lakeside Ave., will present “A Day for Us: A Women & Minority Maker’s Market + Awareness Event” from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Visit information booths and learn about local causes and organizations like Richmond Reproductive Freedom Project and Virginia Pride. Forgo shopping at big-box stores and support small, women (including trans women/women identifying/non-cisgender male) and minority-owned businesses. Vendors will (voluntarily) donate 15% of proceeds to a local non-profit working toward empowering women and minorities while promoting equality for all. For details, visit http://tinyurl.com/ADayForUs. Full text

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