Henrico County VA

A Rare Thrill

WWII Pilot Flies Last Remaining B-24
Courtesy Page Dowdy/Chesterfield Observer
It’s been 65 years since Bob Bluford last took the controls of a bomber plane, but the decades haven’t dulled his pilot’s instincts.

While on route from Staunton to Chesterfield last month in the only remaining airworthy B-24, Bluford did not hesitate to accept an invitation to sit in the co-pilot’s seat.

And when the pilot of the craft handed him the controls, Bluford didn’t hold back either. The 91-year-old Presbyterian minister remained at the helm almost the entire flight before relinquishing the stick for a landing at Chesterfield County Airport.

Asked if his flight training came easily to mind after all those years, Bluford answered in the affirmative.

“But I didn’t try any funny stuff,” he said with a chuckle. “I just flew straight and level.”

After volunteering for the U.S. Army Air Force in 1942, Bluford served as a B-24 bomber pilot and squadron leader, flying 18 missions over the European Theater. While he was based in England, his brother Harry was a ground crew chief, working with P-38’s in Italy. The day after Bob Bluford’s flight, Harry – now 90 and a resident of The Masonic Home – enjoyed his own flight tour of Richmond.

Organized by The Collings Foundation, an educational non-profit that sponsors living history events, the flight provided five local vets in all with an airborne stroll down Memory Lane, just in time for Veteran’s Day. The Wings of Freedom Tour, which left Richmond Oct. 22 bound for North Carolina, is designed both to honor veterans and to educate visitors. Every year, an estimated three to four million people see the planes, which include a B-17 and a P-51 in addition to the B-24.

Polegreen Preacher
Since his World War II days, Reverend Robert Bluford, Jr. has leaned more towards shepherding church congregations than piloting planes.

Resuming his interrupted studies at Hampden-Sydney College, he graduated as valedictorian in 1947 and went on to the seminary. He later served as campus minister at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and had pastorates in North Carolina and South Carolina, then was active in the civil rights movement and war protests of the 1960s. In 1979, he co-founded the Fan Free Medical Clinic, and in 1989, he founded the Historic Polegreen Church Foundation in Hanover County.

Samuel Davies, the first non-Anglican minister licensed to preach in Virginia, pastored the Polegreen Church from 1747 to 1759. Among Davies’ regular listeners at Polegreen, considered the birthplace of religious freedom in Virginia, was young Patrick Henry – who later credited Davies with “teaching me what an orator should be.”

In addition to establishing Polegreen and overseeing its placement on the National Register of Historic Places, Bluford played a significant role in the preservation of Henrico County’s Laurel Historic District, which is also on the register. He is an author as well, having chronicled the Samuel Davies story and the history of Polegreen in the book, “Living on the Borders of Eternity.”

“He has a profound knowledge of history,” says long-time admirer Susan Nochta, who was among the friends celebrating his flight. “If you have any questions on history, Reverend will probably know the answer.”

On a historic tour with Bluford, she adds, he can talk about “every single building, how every brick was laid, who was who and who said what.” A former runner, Bluford always carries his running shoes in the car and is known for conducting impromptu, hands-on tours that involve anything from a trek through the woods to digging up dirt.

Last One Left
Nochta notes that Bluford is tireless as a guest preacher as well, and never misses an opportunity to speak on the topic of religious freedom and Polegreen.

“There’s not a church he hasn’t preached at,” says Nochta. “Bob is amazing. He reaches out, he never reaches in. He’s given us so much insight – as Christians, friends, family members, and loved ones.

“He’s definitely my hero,” adds Nochta, noting how gratified she was to see Bluford enjoy an opportunity like the B-24 flight.

After his flight, Bluford observed that the feat was even more remarkable considering that almost all of the B-24’s built -- except for a handful preserved in museums – were later “chopped up” for scrap.

“[That plane] was the only one of 18,000 made that is left in the world,” he said, “and still flies.”

What’s more, it appears, the rare bird could not have been in more capable hands.

When Bluford asked the pilot, “How much altitude did I gain or lose?” he was pleased to hear that he had kept the aircraft flying level and true.

“It was quite a thrill for me,” said Bluford. “I’m very grateful.”
Community

Lions Club donates backpacks to elementary school

The Richmond West Breakfast Lions Club (based in western Henrico) recently donated 59 backpacks to the Westover Hills Elementary School on Jahnke Road.

Above, club members display some of the backpacks prior to their distribution. > Read more.

Glen Allen student to perform at Carnegie Hall

Thanks to a first-place win in The American Protege International Vocal Competition 2014, Glen Allen High School student Matija Tomas will travel to New York City to perform at Carnegie Hall in December.

At the first-place winners recital in Weill Hall, Matija will perform Giacomo Puccini’s opera aria, “Chi il bel sogna di doretta.” She will perform with other vocalists from around the world and have the opportunity to win other awards and scholarships.

Locally, Thomas has performed with Richmond’s renowned Glorious Christmas Nights, Christian Youth Theatre, and WEAG’s Urban Gospel Youth Choir. > Read more.

Gayton Baptist Church dedicates new outreach center


The John Rolfe YMCA and Gayton Baptist Church have partnered in an effort to bring greater health and wellness opportunities to the community.

Through this partnership, the John Rolfe Y will run Youth Winter Sports programs, including basketball and indoor soccer, in Gayton’s newly renovated $5.5 million outreach center that features a new gymnasium, youth and teen space, social space with café, meeting space and full service commercial kitchen. > Read more.

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Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


For our Top 10 calendar events this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Brews and bites done right

Urban Tavern’s big, bold themes impress

The Urban Tavern opened in August, replacing the former Shackelford’s space at 10498 Ridgefield Parkway in Short Pump. Because of local and longtime devotion to Shackleford’s, Urban Tavern has some big shoes to fill.

Without any background information, I headed to the restaurant for dinner on a Wednesday night, two months after its opening.

On a perfect fall evening, four out of eight outdoor tables were taken, giving the impression that the restaurant was busier than it was. On the inside, a couple tables were taken, and a few folks were seated at the bar. > Read more.

A terrible, horrible movie. . . that’s actually pretty good

‘Alexander’ provides uncomplicated family fun
It’s not surprising in the least that Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day doesn’t much resemble the book it’s based upon.

Judith Viorst’s 1972 picture book isn’t exactly overflowing with movie-worthy material. Boy has bad day. Boy is informed that everyone has bad days sometimes. Then, the back cover.

In the film, the terrible, horrible, no good, very bad-ness is blown up to more extreme size. Alexander Cooper (Ed Oxenbould) has a bum day every day, while the rest of his family (Steve Carell, Jennifer Garner, Dylan Minnette, Kerris Dorsey) exist in a constant bubble of perfection and cheery optimism – to the point that the family is so wrapped up in their own success that Alexander’s being ignored.

So on the eve of his 12th birthday, Alexander makes a wish: just once, he’d like his family to see things from his perspective; to experience the crushing disappointment of one of those no good, very bad days. Once he has blown out the candle on his pre-birthday ice cream sundae, his family’s fate is sealed: one full day of crippling disasters for all of them. > Read more.

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Virginia Opera will present “The Empress and the Nightingale” at 3 p.m. at Weinstein JCC. This adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen’s classic of the same name is a children’s story… Full text

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