‘Maronite marathon’

Nazira Haboush (left) and Dalal El-Jour prepare food for the Lebanese Food Festival.
Take a few hundred pounds of grape and cabbage leaves, another few hundred pounds of ground lamb, an army of industrious volunteers and what do you get?

Enough Lebanese delicacies to last through the weekend – you hope.

When the 27th annual Lebanese Food Festival opens May 13 at 10 a.m., it will bring an end to months of preparation for the volunteers from St. Anthony Maronite Catholic Church – and launch a three-day weekend of even more frenzied chopping, baking, stuffing and grilling.

As an estimated crowd of 20,000 hungry festival-goers descends on the church's 15-acre campus to gorge on shawirma, bubbaghanooge, zalabia and other Lebanese treats, church members circle the wagons: four refrigerated trucks to hold all the fresh ingredients.

One entire truck is dedicated to storing the vegetables for tabouli – a mixture of parsley, cracked wheat, onion and tomato that must be hand-chopped. At least half the festival offerings will be made fresh over the weekend, according to festival spokeswoman Sandra Joseph Brown.

"We call it the Maronite Marathon," says Brown.

Pie wars
As for the rest of the menu items, they got their start on the first Tuesday in February, when volunteers begin meeting two or more days a week in the banquet hall behind the church to stuff squash, make meat, cheese and spinach pies and roll cabbage and grape leaves to freeze for the festival.

They'll need 24,000 pies – enough to sell one every four seconds on festival weekend. The volunteers jokingly call this stage of preparation, and the friendly competitions it inspires between the workers, the "Pie Wars."

As volunteers sat down March 29 to begin stuffing and rolling 1500 pounds of raw grape leaves and cabbage leaves – enough leaves, it's been estimated, to stretch from St. Anthony's to Short Pump Town Center if laid end to end – they did not appear the least bit daunted by the task.

On the contrary; they were just relieved to have finished the meat pies.

"We're always glad to get those over with," said Rosie Shaia, one of the volunteer coordinators. "They're so messy because of the flour."

As the women worked, they gossiped about celebrities, speculated on the outcome of "Dancing with the Stars" – and laughed a lot.

"We don't just work," said Shaia. "We talk; we celebrate birthdays.

"But," she added with an amused smile, "I crack the whip if they get too lazy!"

Going to pot
Held annually on the weekend after Mother's Day, the festival began more than two decades ago as a Sunday picnic, and has grown to become a popular family and community event – one of the largest festivals in the Richmond area.

So, while the ladies of St. Anthony's will enjoy their Mother's Day meals, gifts and family get-togethers as much as anyone else, they will also be bracing themselves for the "Mother's Day hangover" of intense preparation that begins first thing next morning.

"We start on Monday and go round the clock," says Shaia.

On Friday, as little Sadler Road becomes a bumper-to-bumper thoroughfare and cars stream into the parking lot, the pace picks up a hundredfold. Some 300 volunteers are needed to staff the festival itself.

"We're all here all week," says Theresa Esper, a veteran of 24 years with the festival. "The house goes to pot. And so does the family!"

From the smile on her face, however, it's plain she can't imagine spending Mother's Day week any other way.

The Lebanese Food Festival will take place May 13-15 at St. Anthony's Maronite Catholic Church, 4611 Sadler Road in Glen Allen. For details and a complete menu, visit stanthonymaronitechurch.org, or call 346-1161 or 270-7234.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Crime Stoppers’ Crime of the Week: May 22, 2017

This week, Crime Stoppers needs your help to find the suspects vandalizing Dominion Energy equipment in Varina.

On Feb. 6 and May 3, someone shot at equipment belonging to Dominion Energy. Both incidents occurred near Kingsland Road between the hours of midnight and 3 a.m. The equipment was damaged, causing a major inconvenience to customers who lost power and posing a safety hazard to people nearby. > Read more.

A place to excel

It's no surprise when a business deal begins to take shape during a golf outing.

Perhaps less common is the business deal that percolates during a youth football practice. But such was the case for Varina District Supervisor Tyrone Nelson.

During a visit to former Varina High School football star Michael Robinson's football camp, Nelson was discussing with Robinson his excitement for the new Varina Library, whose opening last June was at that time forthcoming.
> Read more.

Business in brief


Long & Foster Real Estate recently named Amy Enoch as the new manager of its Tuckahoe office. Enoch brings more than 15 years of real estate expertise to her new position, and she most recently led Long & Foster’s Village of Midlothian office. Enoch has served in both sales and management positions during her tenure at Long & Foster. Prior to her real estate career, Enoch worked in information technology and hospitality. She is a graduate of Radford University, where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in economics, English and history. Enoch has also received the designation of Graduate, Realtor Institute (GRI) from the National Association of Realtors, and this showcases her expertise in the fundamentals of real estate. > Read more.

Henrico recognized as a 2017 ‘Playful City USA’ community


A national nonprofit organization, KaBOOM!, has selected Henrico County as a 2017 Playful City USA community. The organization encourages communities to bring fun and balanced activities to children every day.

Henrico's selection is joined by the city of Richmond, town of Ashland, as well as the counties of Charles City, Chesterfield, Goochland, Hanover, New Kent and Powhatan. All of the localities make up the first region completely recognized through Playful City USA. > Read more.

Gallagher Foundation serves more than 14,000 teens in first year


In its first year, The Cameron K. Gallagher Foundation reached 14,000 teens through its programs from Spring 2016 to date. The foundation is dedicated to spreading positivity and erasing stigmas by educating and creating awareness on depression, anxiety and stress among teens. CKG delivers programs at schools, community events and its West End office.

“Students are in need of the information in the workshops, whether they know it or not, and they aren’t getting it anywhere else,” said Beth Curry, Director of Health and Wellness at The Steward School. > Read more.

Henrico Business Bulletin Board

May 2017
S M T W T F S
·
1
·
·
·

Calendar page

Classifieds

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

Jewish Family Theatre will present “Bad Jews” at 7:30 p.m. May 10-11 and at 2 p.m. May 14 at the Weinstein Jewish Community Center, 5403 Monument Ave. This production, directed by Debra Clinton, has strong language and is recommended for an adult audience. Tickets are $20 for JCC members, $30 for nonmembers and $15 for seniors and students. For details, call 285-6500 or visit http://www.weinsteinjcc.org. Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers

The Plate