Henrico County VA
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Agencies Help Match Children, Adoptive Parents

Every year, thousands of children spend their lives waiting in the social service system to find a place to call home.

According to a national report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 423,773 children were in foster care last September, and 114,556 children were waiting to be adopted. In Virginia alone, 5,927 children are involved in the social services network, whether it is in foster care or with adoptive services.

Although closed adoptions (in which birth parents and adoptive parents have no contact) still exist, open adoptions have become more frequent since the 1970s.

Open adoptions allow the birth parents and adoptive parents to exchange information or even to meet each other before an adoption goes through. The parents can release as little or as much information as they feel comfortable with.

With the growth of the internet and social media, the adoption process has become more open than ever. Prospective adoptive parents are about to post advertisements online explaining what they are looking for and who they are. Many foster children around the country have done the same, in hopes of finding a family somewhere along the internet.

Adoption services are available through many organizations, including several locally.

Adoptions With Love by JFS (Jewish Family Services) has been an organized adoption agency since the 1950s. The organization itself came about in 1849, with an outgrowth of the Congregation Beth Ahabah located on Franklin Street, and was formed from a group of German immigrant women helping to serve those who needed help in the community. The adoption services component began in the 1950s, when adoption became a more popular means of family establishment.

Jessica Carty, a licensed clinical social worker with JFS, explains that “the adoption process has changed a lot over the past 50 years,” due to social, legislative and cultural changes in society.

“It used to be that all adoptions were closed, and there wasn’t any information exchanged,” Carty said. “It’s become much more open as times have changed and as people have become more vocal about knowing their family of origin or knowing what has happened to the child.”

JFS offers both closed and open adoption services, domestic and overseas, as well as counseling and support for the families, birth parents and adult adoptees. The organization will also help adopted adults to find their birth parents.

Every adoption in the United States is required to have a home study as well, where the adoptive parents are assessed on their stability and suitability for adoption. This assessment must be done by a social worker, and all JFS employees involved with the adoption programs are social workers.

“We did 33 home studies last year, and on average we handle 40 adoption cases a year,” said Sydney Fleischer, the chief operating officer for JFS.

The organization is not just there for the adoption process, but is involved afterwards as well. After placement of a child, JFS makes a series of post-placement visits and offers support groups for families.

The main goal of Adoptions with Love by JFS is to secure homes for children who need them and help people who are deciding whether adoption or another route is best.

“The message we like to have is that there are lot of ways to become a family, and we can help in one way or another,” Fleischer said. “JFS serves the entire community, not just the Jewish community. Our goal is to just help people become a family, and inform them that there are so many options out there.”

Commonwealth Catholic Charities began in 1923, as an organization set up to assist with charitable practices of the church and provide social case work. Marge Savage Thornton is the adoption program manager for Commonwealth Catholic Charities, and describes the organization as a family service agency.

“The main theme is certainly working with families,” Thornton said.

The CCC provides many programs including domestic violence and anger management services, pregnancy counseling, family and individual counseling, child placing, adoption and foster care.

CCC provides several methods of adoptions, including infant adoption, international adoption or foster adoptions; the adoptions can be open or closed. The organization helps women who have an un-intended pregnancy by providing for them several resources and services through which they can decide which option is best for them regarding the child.

“Our services, since we’re a Catholic charity, are designed for women who carry their pregnancy to term,” Thornton said. “So if they are not choosing parenting then we can also offer them adoption services.”

One main program is the pregnancy counseling program, which provides services to women as well as assisting the women if they need help with Medicaid, shelter, or even baby supplies. If the birth mother does choose the route of adoption, the organization takes over custody of the child at birth, and the child is usually placed in the adoptive home immediately.

“Adoptions are more open than they’ve ever been, so it’s not unusual for a child to be born and go directly into the adoptive home in a legal placement if the birth family and the adoptive family choose that option,” Thornton said.

A legal placement occurs when parental rights of the birth mother haven’t been terminated, but the child is placed and is living in the adoptive home. Sometimes infants are also placed in foster care until the birth mothers’ parental rights are terminated.

All adoptions are handled by a team of social workers inside the organization who hold degrees in either social work or counseling. Thornton says the organization set up 55 successful adoptions in 2009 and averages 60 to 65 a year.

CCC also provides search opportunities for adult adoptees looking to find their birth parents, which has become more common in recent years due to the openness of adoption that has evolved over time. The organization will gather information and search for birth parents in order for the adoptee to be able to connect back with their parents and bring closure at the same time.

“It’s such a gift when they can establish a relationship with their birth family, and we help them to achieve that,” Thornton said.

Commonwealth Catholic Charities is a private, non-profit social service agency. The group’s main office can be found in Richmond. This office provides services including adoption, pregnancy counseling, and foster care services.

For details about adoptions or services through Commonwealth Catholic Charities, visit http://www.cccofva.org For d.etails about Adoptions With Love by JFS, or any other service offered by the organization, visit http://www.jfsrichmond.org


Community

Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden raises admission $1

Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s admission has increased by $1 across all categories. Admission is now $12 for adults; $11 for seniors ages 55 and older; and $8 for children ages 3–12. Admission remains free for children ages 3 and younger and for members.

The last price increase was in 2011, before the Garden consistently hosted Butterflies LIVE! (which is included with admission). > Read more.

Garden tails

The threat of bad weather didn’t keep visitors away from Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden July 10 for the facility’s weekly Flowers After 5 event (which pairs music and food with a chance to stroll the garden) and its monthly Fidos After 5 (which allows dog owners to bring their pets with them to enjoy the evening). > Read more.

Western Henrico Rotary helps fund Midwives For Haiti Jeep


Thanks in part to a $10,000 gift from the Western Henrico Rotary Club, another bright pink Jeep modified to travel extremely rough terrain has been delivered to Midwives For Haiti so that more pregnant women in the quake-ravaged country will have access to prenatal care and a greater chance of surviving childbirth.

The funds were raised at the annual casino night held in February, club president Adam Cherry said. The Rotary Club also helped purchase the Virginia-based charity’s first pink jeep three years ago. > Read more.

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Entertainment

‘Top Chef’ finalist to open Willow Lawn restaurant

A finalist in the Bravo television show Top Chef is bringing one of his four restaurant chains to Henrico County.

Bryan Voltaggio, who was the runner-up of the sixth season of Top Chef, (finishing second to his brother, Michael) and his business partner, Hilda Staples, will open their third Family Meal restaurant, at Henrico's Willow Lawn shopping center. The restaurant is expected to open early next year. > Read more.

US Army Field Band to perform in Henrico Aug. 3

The United States Army Field Band will present a free public performance at Deep Run Park in Henrico on Sunday, Aug 3 at 3 p.m.

Members of the band are soldiers who also serve as “musical ambassadors of the Army” and perform for schools and communities nationwide.

The Concert Band will be performing along with the Soldiers’ Chorus. > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


Get up and dance – square dance, that is – with the Tuckahoe Square Dance Club tonight! More musical events this weekend include family-friendly karaoke at Aunt Sarah’s Pancake House, the United States Army Field Band and Soldiers’ Chorus Concert and the Henrico Teen Theatre Company’s production of “The Boy Who Cried Wolf.” For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

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The Jammin’ on the James concert series at Wilton House Museum, 215 S. Wilton Rd., will feature Susan Greenbaum from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Bring a picnic dinner and… Full text

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