Henrico County VA
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True puppy love explained

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of three columns about children and pets.

I believe it was the day after our 15-year-old border collie-Lab mix died that my two children (ages 8 and 5 at the time) began to lobby for a new dog.

Even though we didn’t miss her daily accidents and tumbleweeds of fur and old-age stink, the house wasn’t the same without our sweet Sydney. We needed something furry and licky and waggy to love on us again, and of all pets, only a dog is capable of giving that particular ego-boost.

About four months later, my husband pointed out an advertisement in the pets section of the paper; my eyes subsequently oozed from their sockets as I gazed on the three most adorable creatures ever made in the world. They were five-week-old border collie pups, and I knew I had to have one, preferably that day.

I have included the photograph that ran in the paper, as proof that it wasn’t a fair fight. No dog-lover in her right mind would have turned from those puppies. My husband and I drove out to the breeder the next day and picked out a pup from the litter (only three were left), and I took the little guy home to surprise the kids when they got home from school.

It was just like an after-school special, the way we all took to the energetic puppy, who we collectively named Harry (in honor of our favorite wizard, Harry Potter). But we soon began to see what it might mean to have a purebred border collie as a pet.

See, the breed was trained a long, long time ago to herd sheep. It’s hard-wired in their DNA to be intense, athletic and hard-working. In lieu of actual sheep, they will try to herd anything that moves.

Harry took a liking to our feet. Every morning, by way of greeting, he would attack our moving feet with his little needle teeth. The kids were so traumatized by this that they carried bowls of dog treats downstairs in the mornings to distract him from his smelly prey. He also liked brooms and vacuums and scooters and bikes and small children running through the backyard.

But we didn’t truly care about Harry’s neuroses, for we already knew him to be the missing piece of our family puzzle. Then came the day that he started vomiting up his food. After a couple of days of periodic vomiting, I grew concerned, but his listlessness was the most alarming symptom. Based on what I knew about border collies, I surmised that a listless border collie pup was a sick one.

I took him to the vet, who told me that his kidneys weren’t functioning properly and recommended that I take him to the specialty veterinarian to have some tests done. We all left poor limp Harry at this vet for testing, not quite believing we’d never see him again. The vet called us the next day to tell us that his nine-week-old kidneys were indeed failing (no reason could be determined without an autopsy), and gently suggested that we put him down.

It was one of the saddest days of my life. And yes, I cried for a long while after that phone call. But telling my husband and children, and watching them mourn poor Harry, was much more painful than my own grief.

With Sydney’s death, an explanation was easier to give: she was old, she had a good life, we’ll get a puppy. But how do you explain the death of the puppy? My mind was aswirl with existential notions about the unfairness of life, but children need something a bit more uplifting, more nourishing, in times of crisis.

My kids fell asleep that night with tear-stained faces, following some blubbery words I spoke about pets and how they teach us about unconditional love.

We learned, alright. But we hadn’t learned our lesson about border collies. We picked up Harry’s brother – the last of the litter – from the breeder the following week.

To be continued…

Diann Ducharme is the author of The Outer Banks House and is a wife, mother of three children and owner of one border collie. You can find her at http://www.diannducharme.com where, she blogs about the writing life.
Community

Author, child abuse survivor to speak at Henrico event

To help celebrate twenty years of service to advocating for abused and neglected children in Henrico County, Henrico Court Appointed Special Advocates, Inc. (CASA) will host an evening with bestselling author K.L. Randis on Tuesday, Aug. 26, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Belmont Recreation Center in Lakeside.

Randis is best known for her bestselling novel, Spilled Milk, which tells her painful – but ultimately triumphant – personal story of abuse and of child abuse prevention. The book is her first novel.

The event is free to the public, but seating is limited Reservations may be made by e-mailing .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Belmon Recreation Center is located at 1600 Hilliard Road. > Read more.

Philippines ambassador to the US visits Filipino Festival in Henrico


The Ambassador of the Philippines to the United States Jose L. Cuisia, Jr. attended the Ninth Annual Filipino Festival at Our Lady of Lourdes Church earlier this month. Cuisia (pictured above with festival performers) was welcomed by County Manager John Vithoulkas and Brookland District Supervisor Dick Glover (below) at the church, which is located in Lakeside.

While enjoying some of the cultural performances at the festival, the ambassador and his wife had a private lunch with Vithoulkas, Glover, Eldon Burton (an outreach representative from U.S. Senator Mark R. Warner’s Office) and Father James Begley, the pastor of OLL. > Read more.

Dragon boats invade the James

Hundreds of spectators filled the banks of the James River to watch two dozen teams of competitors in the Walgreen’s Richmond International Dragon Boat Festival at Rocketts Landing Aug. 2. The event included a number of races, as well as several cultural performances. The sport is billed as the fastest growing water sport in the world.(Photo by Roger Walk for the Henrico Citizen) > Read more.

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Entertainment

‘Planes’ sequel crashes

‘Fire and Rescue’ proves too predictable, boring

Planes: Fire and Rescue opens with a dedication to the hero firefighters of the world. It’s an admirable notion, and it makes sense, given that this is a film about planes that fight fires.

But here it might be a little out of place, as Planes: Fire and Rescue has a few things on its mind besides supporting the men and women who routinely throw themselves into burning buildings.

Like money. Lots and lots of money – into the 11-figures-and-counting range. In case you weren’t aware, 2006’s Cars was the biggest moneymaker Disney had in decades – not because of how much green the film printed at the box office, but because a combination of toys, games and snack foods stamped with the Cars seal of approval routinely pulls in tens of billions of dollars per year. > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


This weekend in Henrico, you can learn about fall herbs or mad science. Enjoy some laughs from West End Comedy or Three-Penny Theatre’s production of “The Rivah Home Companion.” For music lovers, Jennifer Nettles is in concert tonight and the fifth annual GWAR-B-Q takes place tomorrow at Hadad’s Lake. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Restaurant watch

Find out how your favorite dining establishments fared during their most recent inspections by the Virginia Department of Health. > Read more.

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Calendar

Virginia Blood Services will hold a blood drive from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Glen Allen Library, 10501 Staples Mill Rd. All walk-ins are welcome and donors are encouraged… Full text

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