Henrico County VA

True puppy love explained

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of three columns about children and pets.

I believe it was the day after our 15-year-old border collie-Lab mix died that my two children (ages 8 and 5 at the time) began to lobby for a new dog.

Even though we didn’t miss her daily accidents and tumbleweeds of fur and old-age stink, the house wasn’t the same without our sweet Sydney. We needed something furry and licky and waggy to love on us again, and of all pets, only a dog is capable of giving that particular ego-boost.

About four months later, my husband pointed out an advertisement in the pets section of the paper; my eyes subsequently oozed from their sockets as I gazed on the three most adorable creatures ever made in the world. They were five-week-old border collie pups, and I knew I had to have one, preferably that day.

I have included the photograph that ran in the paper, as proof that it wasn’t a fair fight. No dog-lover in her right mind would have turned from those puppies. My husband and I drove out to the breeder the next day and picked out a pup from the litter (only three were left), and I took the little guy home to surprise the kids when they got home from school.

It was just like an after-school special, the way we all took to the energetic puppy, who we collectively named Harry (in honor of our favorite wizard, Harry Potter). But we soon began to see what it might mean to have a purebred border collie as a pet.

See, the breed was trained a long, long time ago to herd sheep. It’s hard-wired in their DNA to be intense, athletic and hard-working. In lieu of actual sheep, they will try to herd anything that moves.

Harry took a liking to our feet. Every morning, by way of greeting, he would attack our moving feet with his little needle teeth. The kids were so traumatized by this that they carried bowls of dog treats downstairs in the mornings to distract him from his smelly prey. He also liked brooms and vacuums and scooters and bikes and small children running through the backyard.

But we didn’t truly care about Harry’s neuroses, for we already knew him to be the missing piece of our family puzzle. Then came the day that he started vomiting up his food. After a couple of days of periodic vomiting, I grew concerned, but his listlessness was the most alarming symptom. Based on what I knew about border collies, I surmised that a listless border collie pup was a sick one.

I took him to the vet, who told me that his kidneys weren’t functioning properly and recommended that I take him to the specialty veterinarian to have some tests done. We all left poor limp Harry at this vet for testing, not quite believing we’d never see him again. The vet called us the next day to tell us that his nine-week-old kidneys were indeed failing (no reason could be determined without an autopsy), and gently suggested that we put him down.

It was one of the saddest days of my life. And yes, I cried for a long while after that phone call. But telling my husband and children, and watching them mourn poor Harry, was much more painful than my own grief.

With Sydney’s death, an explanation was easier to give: she was old, she had a good life, we’ll get a puppy. But how do you explain the death of the puppy? My mind was aswirl with existential notions about the unfairness of life, but children need something a bit more uplifting, more nourishing, in times of crisis.

My kids fell asleep that night with tear-stained faces, following some blubbery words I spoke about pets and how they teach us about unconditional love.

We learned, alright. But we hadn’t learned our lesson about border collies. We picked up Harry’s brother – the last of the litter – from the breeder the following week.

To be continued…

Diann Ducharme is the author of The Outer Banks House and is a wife, mother of three children and owner of one border collie. You can find her at http://www.diannducharme.com where, she blogs about the writing life.
Community

Holman student named Miss Va. Coed Junior Teen


Holman Middle School student Victoria Nguyen recently was named Miss Virginia American Coed Junior Teen after competing in the Miss Virginia American Coed pageant in Williamsburg. She was the youngest competitor in her division. Nguyen now will advance to represent Virginia at the 2015 Miss American Junior Teen Pageant at Walt Disney World in Florida in November. > Read more.

Companion Extraordinaire to honor veterans May 14

Companion Extraordinaire Home Care and Skilled Services will be honoring veterans and current military members May 14 at 11 a.m. The event will take place at 5311 Lakeside Avenue.

Companion Extraordinaire dedicated a hall in its new Lakeside office as a “Wall of Honor” and will be presenting 13 military service men and women with certificates as well as placing their service photos on the wall.
> Read more.

Henrico student among 3 vying for national $10,000 scholarship

Public vote open through Friday to select winner
Henrico resident Haley Malloy is one of three national finalists for a $10,000 scholarship, whose winner will be determined by the vote of the public.

Malloy is a finalist for The Goddard School Anthony A. Martino Scholarship, which is open annually to any high school junior or senior who graduated from a Goddard School pre-kindergarten or kindergarten program. Applicants are evaluated based upon the work ethic and perseverance they have demonstrated – two key characteristics of Martino, the founder of the Goddard School franchise system. > Read more.

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Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


Music lovers unite! There are several great concerts this weekend beginning with Innsbrook After Hours who will be kicking off their 30th season with Foreigner, Lee Brice, and Rusted Root & The Wailers. The Richmond Women’s Chorus will present “Let Freedom Sing” at the Henrico Theatre tonight; The Taters will perform tomorrow at The Tin Pan; and the Richmond Choral Society will present “Sentimental Journey III” on Sunday at the Henrico Theatre. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

More than monkey business

Disneynature’s ‘Monkey Kingdom’ is its strongest yet

“Did you know monkeys could swim?” asks Tina Fey in Monkey Kingdom. While she’s asking, a toque macaque (a two foot-long monkey with red-white fur and great hair) breast-strokes under the surface of a pond, yanking out lily pad flowers by her teeth and dragging them ashore to munch later.

Turns out monkeys can swim. And slide down telephone poles. And do the thing from Flashdance where you bring down a cascade of water on your head and shake it off in slow-motion.

All will happen in Monkey Kingdom, the eighth film in nine years from Disneynature, Disney’s wildlife documentary outlet. > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


Relax this holiday weekend with Fridays Uncorked at Southern Season – taste wines from the Roman Empire! Or at James River Cellars who is hosting “Experience Virginia” – sample Virginia wine, beer, cider and mead. And what goes better with wine than strawberries – an annual tradition in Varina, the Gallmeyer Farms’ Strawberry Fields Festival is tomorrow. Other fun happenings this weekend include: “A Little Princess” at The Cultural Arts Center at Glen Allen; weekly dance at American Legion Post 125; and National Theatre Live’s “Man and Superman” at the University of Richmond. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

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Innsbrook After Hours will present George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic at 6 p.m. Gates open at 5 p.m. Tickets are $15 to $79. All proceeds from the concert series benefit… Full text

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