Henrico County VA
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True puppy love explained

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of three columns about children and pets.

I believe it was the day after our 15-year-old border collie-Lab mix died that my two children (ages 8 and 5 at the time) began to lobby for a new dog.

Even though we didn’t miss her daily accidents and tumbleweeds of fur and old-age stink, the house wasn’t the same without our sweet Sydney. We needed something furry and licky and waggy to love on us again, and of all pets, only a dog is capable of giving that particular ego-boost.

About four months later, my husband pointed out an advertisement in the pets section of the paper; my eyes subsequently oozed from their sockets as I gazed on the three most adorable creatures ever made in the world. They were five-week-old border collie pups, and I knew I had to have one, preferably that day.

I have included the photograph that ran in the paper, as proof that it wasn’t a fair fight. No dog-lover in her right mind would have turned from those puppies. My husband and I drove out to the breeder the next day and picked out a pup from the litter (only three were left), and I took the little guy home to surprise the kids when they got home from school.

It was just like an after-school special, the way we all took to the energetic puppy, who we collectively named Harry (in honor of our favorite wizard, Harry Potter). But we soon began to see what it might mean to have a purebred border collie as a pet.

See, the breed was trained a long, long time ago to herd sheep. It’s hard-wired in their DNA to be intense, athletic and hard-working. In lieu of actual sheep, they will try to herd anything that moves.

Harry took a liking to our feet. Every morning, by way of greeting, he would attack our moving feet with his little needle teeth. The kids were so traumatized by this that they carried bowls of dog treats downstairs in the mornings to distract him from his smelly prey. He also liked brooms and vacuums and scooters and bikes and small children running through the backyard.

But we didn’t truly care about Harry’s neuroses, for we already knew him to be the missing piece of our family puzzle. Then came the day that he started vomiting up his food. After a couple of days of periodic vomiting, I grew concerned, but his listlessness was the most alarming symptom. Based on what I knew about border collies, I surmised that a listless border collie pup was a sick one.

I took him to the vet, who told me that his kidneys weren’t functioning properly and recommended that I take him to the specialty veterinarian to have some tests done. We all left poor limp Harry at this vet for testing, not quite believing we’d never see him again. The vet called us the next day to tell us that his nine-week-old kidneys were indeed failing (no reason could be determined without an autopsy), and gently suggested that we put him down.

It was one of the saddest days of my life. And yes, I cried for a long while after that phone call. But telling my husband and children, and watching them mourn poor Harry, was much more painful than my own grief.

With Sydney’s death, an explanation was easier to give: she was old, she had a good life, we’ll get a puppy. But how do you explain the death of the puppy? My mind was aswirl with existential notions about the unfairness of life, but children need something a bit more uplifting, more nourishing, in times of crisis.

My kids fell asleep that night with tear-stained faces, following some blubbery words I spoke about pets and how they teach us about unconditional love.

We learned, alright. But we hadn’t learned our lesson about border collies. We picked up Harry’s brother – the last of the litter – from the breeder the following week.

To be continued…

Diann Ducharme is the author of The Outer Banks House and is a wife, mother of three children and owner of one border collie. You can find her at http://www.diannducharme.com where, she blogs about the writing life.


Community

Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden raises admission $1

Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s admission has increased by $1 across all categories. Admission is now $12 for adults; $11 for seniors ages 55 and older; and $8 for children ages 3–12. Admission remains free for children ages 3 and younger and for members.

The last price increase was in 2011, before the Garden consistently hosted Butterflies LIVE! (which is included with admission). > Read more.

Garden tails

The threat of bad weather didn’t keep visitors away from Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden July 10 for the facility’s weekly Flowers After 5 event (which pairs music and food with a chance to stroll the garden) and its monthly Fidos After 5 (which allows dog owners to bring their pets with them to enjoy the evening). > Read more.

Western Henrico Rotary helps fund Midwives For Haiti Jeep


Thanks in part to a $10,000 gift from the Western Henrico Rotary Club, another bright pink Jeep modified to travel extremely rough terrain has been delivered to Midwives For Haiti so that more pregnant women in the quake-ravaged country will have access to prenatal care and a greater chance of surviving childbirth.

The funds were raised at the annual casino night held in February, club president Adam Cherry said. The Rotary Club also helped purchase the Virginia-based charity’s first pink jeep three years ago. > Read more.

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Entertainment

Weekend Top 10


Take in a show at several locations this weekend! West End Comedy will provide laughs at HATTheatre; the production of “Pump Boys and Dinettes” will close Sunday; and the youth theatre company CharacterWorks will present “Footloose” at The Steward School. Another show perfect for the kids – “Despicable Me 2” is playing at the Eastern Henrico Recreation Center tonight. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Is there an Echo in here?

‘Earth to Echo’ aims to become this generation’s ‘ET’
It’s no secret that all found-footage genre movies are the same. Grab a couple of characters, give one of them a camera, and expose them to something supernatural that’s content to lurk just off-screen until the last five minutes. Everything else will just fall into place.

But that formula isn’t particularly family friendly, if only because that thing waiting a few feet to the left of the cast is usually plotting their violent doom.

That’s what sets Earth to Echo apart from the pack. It, too, follows a group of characters armed with a camera and a tendency to encounter unknown life forms. But all those familiar parts have been rearranged just enough to make it suitable for a much younger audience. > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


An eclectic array of events are taking place this weekend throughout the county. In the West End, we have the Richmond Wedding Expo, the Under the Stars Family Film Series and Henrico Theatre Company’s production of “Pump Boys and Dinettes.” In the eastern part of the county, we have a blood drive at the Eastern Henrico Recreation Center, Gallmeyer Farm’s annual Sweet Corn Festival and an origami workshop at Fairfield Library. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

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Virginia Blood Services will hold a blood drive from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Dorey Recreation Center, 2999 Darbytown Rd. All walk-ins are welcome and donors are encouraged to… Full text

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