Henrico County VA
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The son also writes

Forgive me, readers. It’s been six years since my last confession, by which I mean a column for the Henrico Citizen.

I took some time off from column-writing to pen a novel, never believing it would be published. But the historical novel, entitled The Outer Banks House, was published by Crown in June of 2010.

I made the whole business look too easy, I’m afraid, for now my eleven-year-old son believes that he too will be a published author, most likely in the next couple of years.

My son has other grand visions for himself as well. He wants to be a professional tennis player when he grows up. He wants a pool in the big backyard of his big house and a menagerie of pets that I would never let him have.

I told him that authors don’t make very much money, barring those best-selling novelists like Stephen King and John Grisham. I told him I’ve thought of starting my own “Occupy Publishing House” movement, to try to draw attention to the 99 percent of published authors who don’t make enough to support even themselves, much less a family.

But my pep talks don’t seem to sway him away from the activity of writing.

My son spent a good part of his life watching me write my novel. He watched as I revised it for both my agent and for my editor. He was there when I opened the first delivery of hardback books from the publishing house. He often met my readers at book-signings and read a few of the e-mails I received.

Ah, the writing life. So glamorous.

I wouldn’t think that watching someone write would be very interesting. I might equate it with watching someone brush their teeth or cut their fingernails. But he must have found something intriguing about the process, for he now writes fiction pretty much any chance he gets.

“I’m going upstairs to write,” he’ll announce when he gets home from school, or from playing outside with friends, or from tennis practice. He writes more than I do these days, if you want to know the truth. Whole chapters, day after day after day. My son writes like he talks, which it to say, a lot.

I recently read the first chapter of a book that he’s writing about three young boys who stumble upon a forgotten zoo. I was amazed at his pacing, his use of dialogue, his subtle humor. And he has other ideas on the back-burner, including a children’s book about border collies (based upon our own crazy border collie Toby). He wants to write scripts for a kids’ Saturday Night Live.

I have secretly congratulated myself on having had such a marvelous effect on my first-born offspring. Because of me and my success, my son likes to write! It’s basic parenting knowledge: model the behaviors you wish to see in your children. Read so that your children will want to read, that kind of thing.

But perhaps it’s not me at all.

Perhaps a love of writing is a part of who he is. He doesn’t seem particularly interested in my (a published author’s!) feedback. He’s just content to write for the love of writing itself. It flows naturally from him, a gift from the gods.

I didn’t learn the passion for writing from my parents. But they showed me the value of hard work and persistence. They imparted the value of a good education. I chose the writing life on my own.

In the same vein, my son might one day be a published author, but I would never take the credit for such an accomplishment. It would be his passion and his hard work and persistence that brought about his success, certainly not mine.

Perhaps the only thing I’ve given my son is the courage to face the blank page, and the knowledge that there are readers out there, waiting on a well-told story.

Diann Ducharme is the author of The Outer Banks House and is a wife, mother of three children and owner of one border collie. Her column will appear in the second issue of the Henrico Citizen each month, and you may also find her at http://www.diannducharme.com where, she blogs about the writing life.
Community

Glen Allen student to perform at Carnegie Hall

Thanks to a first-place win in The American Protege International Vocal Competition 2014, Glen Allen High School student Matija Tomas will travel to New York City to perform at Carnegie Hall in December.

At the first-place winners recital in Weill Hall, Matija will perform Giacomo Puccini’s opera aria, “Chi il bel sogna di doretta.” She will perform with other vocalists from around the world and have the opportunity to win other awards and scholarships.

Locally, Thomas has performed with Richmond’s renowned Glorious Christmas Nights, Christian Youth Theatre, and WEAG’s Urban Gospel Youth Choir. > Read more.

Gayton Baptist Church dedicates new outreach center


The John Rolfe YMCA and Gayton Baptist Church have partnered in an effort to bring greater health and wellness opportunities to the community.

Through this partnership, the John Rolfe Y will run Youth Winter Sports programs, including basketball and indoor soccer, in Gayton’s newly renovated $5.5 million outreach center that features a new gymnasium, youth and teen space, social space with café, meeting space and full service commercial kitchen. > Read more.

Henricus Historical Park to host Publick Day Sept. 20

Henricus Historical Park will commemorate its anniversary during Publick Day, a signature annual event that celebrates the establishment of the second successful English settlement in the New World. In September 1611, Sir Thomas Dale, along with soldiers, tradesmen and farmers, ventured from Jamestown to create the Citie of Henricus. Leaders of Henricus developed the first English hospital, chartered the first college in North America, established tobacco as the first cash crop in Virginia, and created a place where Pocahontas lived and met John Rolfe.

Publick Day will take place Saturday, Sept. 20, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free and parking is $5 per vehicle. > Read more.

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Entertainment

Extras sought for AMC’s ‘TURN’

Paid extras are being sought to appear in the AMC television series TURN: Washington's Spies, which will begin filming its second season in the Richmond area at the end of September and continue through February.

No experience is required, but producers say that extras must have flexible availability, reliable transportation and a positive attitude.

Arvold Casting is holding an open call on Sunday, Sept. 21 and is seeking men, women and children who are Caucasian, African American and Native American, with thin to average builds and who can realistically portray people living in Revolutionary War times. Long hair is a plus but not a must. > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


For our Top 10 calendar events this weekend, click here! > Read more.

Weekend Top 10


Check out these three B’s in Henrico this weekend: books, bluegrass and “Born Yesterday.” Other activities to participate in – and feel good about – are the 15th annual James River Regional Cleanup and the 5th annual Richmond Out of the Darkness Community Walk. For all our top picks this weekend, click here! > Read more.

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Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, 1800 Lakeside Ave., will hold a fall plant sale from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 19 and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 20. Regional… Full text

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