Henrico County Opinions

Work ethics: born in the crib (well, almost)


It seems I am not the only person concerned about the numbers of young people who are floundering in the adult world these days.

After writing two columns on the topic of how to grow a grown-up (and hearing many more columns' worth of examples of how not to raise one), I discovered there's now a book out with a similar theme.
> Read more.

Growing a grown-up: Part II


When we last touched on the subject of how to raise a grown-up, I mentioned what I considered the Number One rule: limiting TV and other electronic entertainment. Keeping those in the realm of parental control is essential if kids are to develop initiative and intellectual curiosity – and to grow up understanding that entertainment is not a 24-7 entitlement.

The Number Two rule I would suggest is avoiding “7-Eleven syndrome.”

My friend Cindy coined the term when she was going through a divorce, and her husband would pick up their girls for an outing.
> Read more.

How to grow an adult


It’s been said that two of the most common sources of conflict in a typical marriage are money and sex.

That may be true for the younger set.

Among my fellow sixty-somethings, however, the hot topic lately has been adult children — and the outsized role they play in later-life relationships.

I first heard this complaint from a friend of mine who grumbled that he’d just broken up with a woman he really liked, because he couldn’t stand the way she catered to her grown-yet-irresponsible children.
> Read more.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

The immigration complication

When he was 14 years old, my grandfather left the tiny mountaintop village in Greece where he’d spent his entire existence and walked with several other teens and young men down the mountain – a journey that must have taken a week or more – to the nearest port to board a ship to Athens, then another to New York City.

He never returned to Greece, never saw his parents or three younger brothers again.

I never knew my grandfather, because he died when my dad was just 15, so I never had the chance to ask him: Why?

Why was he willing to make such a painstaking journey at such a young age, giving up everything that he knew in exchange for so many things that he did not. A language. A country. A history. A family.
> Read more.

Heroes of the classroom

The highlight of my eighth-grade year at my Northern Virginia middle school was landing in the social studies class of the incomparable Mr. Hart, a teacher whose reputation for pure awesomeness was well-established long before I entered his classroom for the first time.

Middle-schoolers seem, on average, to be less than enthralled with history, for reasons I never fully understood when I was one. Me? I couldn’t get enough of it.

And as I quickly learned, everything I’d heard about Mr. Hart was true.
> Read more.

School calendar overhaul long overdue


It's a 19th-century anachronism, and long ago stopped serving its intended purpose.

It has failed to keep up with social change, continues to stifle progress, and acts as a major obstacle to growth and improvement.

It makes no sense whatsoever in the 21st century, yet continues to exist because of bureaucratic inertia, resistance to change, and the attitude "we've always done it that way."

It wastes space, time, manpower and – most of all – it results in the waste of millions of young minds.

Yes, I'm talking about our antiquated and inflexible school calendar.
> Read more.

The right to vote – or not

Another election is in the books. Did you vote?

If you did, you’re to be congratulated.

If you didn’t, you’re to be castigated automatically as a thoughtless jerk and a horrible citizen.

Or so it seems in certain circles.

I don’t happen to hold membership in those circles, however.
> Read more.

At a crossroads

A pedestrian attempting to cross West Broad Street at Gaskins Road was struck by a car and seriously injured on Monday night. Immediately afterward, some in the community began calling for increased safety measures at the busy intersection, which serves some 36,000 vehicles a day.

But is fixing the problem of frequent accidents at a busy intersection as easy as that? And in this case, is there truly a discernible and recurrent problem that needs to be fixed at all?
> Read more.

Page 4 of 14 pages ‹ First  < 2 3 4 5 6 >  Last ›

Henrico Business Bulletin Board

October 2017
S M T W T F S
·
·
·
·

Calendar page

tel:18772241804
tel:18772210315

Classifieds

DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels FREE for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL - 888-714-7955
Full text

Place an Ad | More Classifieds

Calendar

Join the Pocahontas Chapter of the Virginia Native Plant Society at 4 p.m. to learn about conservation landscaping on a corporate level. In an introductory talk, Juliellen Sarver of Stone Brewery will share Stone's successes and lessons learned as they developed their native landscape; it is information that can easily be used for home landscaping. Following the talk, there will be a tour of the patio landscape and natural areas. The brewery is located at 4300 Williamsburg Rd. Arrive at least 15 minutes early as the talk will start promptly. Anyone with an interest in native landscape is welcome, from novice to expert. To register, contact Leslie Allanson at 335-5866 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Full text

Your weather just got better.

Henricopedia

Henrico's Top Teachers

The Plate