Henrico County Opinions

Growing a grown-up: Part II


When we last touched on the subject of how to raise a grown-up, I mentioned what I considered the Number One rule: limiting TV and other electronic entertainment. Keeping those in the realm of parental control is essential if kids are to develop initiative and intellectual curiosity – and to grow up understanding that entertainment is not a 24-7 entitlement.

The Number Two rule I would suggest is avoiding “7-Eleven syndrome.”

My friend Cindy coined the term when she was going through a divorce, and her husband would pick up their girls for an outing.
> Read more.

How to grow an adult


It’s been said that two of the most common sources of conflict in a typical marriage are money and sex.

That may be true for the younger set.

Among my fellow sixty-somethings, however, the hot topic lately has been adult children — and the outsized role they play in later-life relationships.

I first heard this complaint from a friend of mine who grumbled that he’d just broken up with a woman he really liked, because he couldn’t stand the way she catered to her grown-yet-irresponsible children.
> Read more.

Make ‘em take the pledge: no more snuff boxes!


I got in touch with my delegate to the Virginia General Assembly a short while back, to ask about the money. I was told he was on vacation, and I'm sure he needed a rest. The legislature had just downed tools and dispersed, after its season of public service.

But I didn't get a call when he returned to Richmond, either. That's okay, I think I get it: Jimmie Massie, a Republican, has since announced that he won't stand for re-election in the 72nd District in November.
> Read more.
Bail Bonds Chesterfield VA

Mi-‘Steak’-en anger

A seemingly popular West End restaurant closed this week without warning, leaving its staff unexpectedly jobless and plenty of fingers pointed angrily at its owner.

This was the angle most commonly reported during coverage of the closing of Quaker Steak and Lube on West Broad Street, and while it’s certainly a difficult situation coming a few weeks before the holidays, there’s also another angle that doesn’t get coverage – perhaps because it doesn’t fit the broadcast narrative.

The common cry here is “How could someone do this to his employees – and just weeks before Christmas, no less?! How dare he!”
> Read more.

Letters to the Editor


School overcrowding causes foundation problems

Editor:

I believe the article “Henrico School Board weighs projects” by Citizen Editor Tom Lappas is important to those of Henrico County. I am originally from Henrico but I am currently a student at James Madison University. In my current sociology class, education is a big topic of discussion.

I am sure that it is common sense that a bad foundation of knowledge leads to later struggles with education; however, what some may not realize is overcrowding, like what is occurring at the four elementary schools in Brookland District, is one of the leading causes in a weak foundation. Based on research, boys struggle with verbal skills early on.
> Read more.

The immigration complication

When he was 14 years old, my grandfather left the tiny mountaintop village in Greece where he’d spent his entire existence and walked with several other teens and young men down the mountain – a journey that must have taken a week or more – to the nearest port to board a ship to Athens, then another to New York City.

He never returned to Greece, never saw his parents or three younger brothers again.

I never knew my grandfather, because he died when my dad was just 15, so I never had the chance to ask him: Why?

Why was he willing to make such a painstaking journey at such a young age, giving up everything that he knew in exchange for so many things that he did not. A language. A country. A history. A family.
> Read more.

Heroes of the classroom

The highlight of my eighth-grade year at my Northern Virginia middle school was landing in the social studies class of the incomparable Mr. Hart, a teacher whose reputation for pure awesomeness was well-established long before I entered his classroom for the first time.

Middle-schoolers seem, on average, to be less than enthralled with history, for reasons I never fully understood when I was one. Me? I couldn’t get enough of it.

And as I quickly learned, everything I’d heard about Mr. Hart was true.
> Read more.

School calendar overhaul long overdue


It's a 19th-century anachronism, and long ago stopped serving its intended purpose.

It has failed to keep up with social change, continues to stifle progress, and acts as a major obstacle to growth and improvement.

It makes no sense whatsoever in the 21st century, yet continues to exist because of bureaucratic inertia, resistance to change, and the attitude "we've always done it that way."

It wastes space, time, manpower and – most of all – it results in the waste of millions of young minds.

Yes, I'm talking about our antiquated and inflexible school calendar.
> Read more.

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Henrico Business Bulletin Board

June 2017
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Calendar

The Ostomy Association of Greater Richmond, a support group for individuals who have had or are anticipating an ostomy, meets on the third Wednesday of each month (except July, August and December) at 7:30 p.m. at Henrico Doctors’ Hospital-Forest Campus, Williamsburg-A Room. Elizabeth Holland, who represents Hollister, Inc., will present new ostomy products. Guests are always welcome. For details, contact Mike Rollston at 232-1916 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Full text

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